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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My son has an 02 Eclipse GT. Replaced timing belt, crankshaft sensor, cam seals plugs, wires, battery, etc. . After driving it for about 2K miles. The starts and runs like a champ. Until today; the car dies after driving it between 5 and 8 miles. It is throwing a P0335 code. Cranks but won't start. If you clear the code and let it sit iapprox 15 mins it will start and drive approx 5 miles and die. At my wits end, any ideas?
 

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2001 Spyder GT. Koni adj.shocks. CAI, ST swaybar.17X8.5 rims. LED lighting.
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I would check to see if the crank sensor it mounted securely and nothing had been disturbed down there. You may have not gotten it tight, or correctly mounted. The position of the sensor in relation the crank pulley is critical to it working correctly. ...J.D.
 

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My son has an 02 Eclipse GT. Replaced timing belt, crankshaft sensor, cam seals plugs, wires, battery, etc. . After driving it for about 2K miles. The starts and runs like a champ. Until today; the car dies after driving it between 5 and 8 miles. It is throwing a P0335 code. Cranks but won't start. If you clear the code and let it sit iapprox 15 mins it will start and drive approx 5 miles and die. At my wits end, any ideas?
P0335 is set by an error signal on the crankshaft position sensor. The sensor itself is simple, but a problem with any of the wiring between the sensor and the ECM, including a poor ground, can cause problems.

When you replaced the sensor, did you use OEM or a name brand aftermarket part? I'd expect to pay $30-$40. If you paid significantly less, the part might have been too cheap and failed already.

If you have a multimeter, I'd check out the troubleshooting procedures for the crankshaft position sensor. The full factory service manual is available at tearstone.com, and the check procedures are in section 13B, page 13B-248. Skip the steps that require a special Mitsubishi scan tool.

Another thing to check is the physical connectino between the crankshaft sprocket and the crankshaft reluctor wheel. The sprocket controls the physical timing of the engine, and the reluctor controls the spark timing. Those two devices should be held tightly together and aligned with a roll pin. It's not rare for the pin to shear and then the reluctor wheel gets out of time with the sprocket. Sometimes the reluctor turns some and then jams in a new position; sometimes the reluctor spins freely. Both are bad and cause crank/no-start, even though the timing marks all line up.

You check this by removing the lower timing cover (sorry!) and inspecting the timing marks. There's a divot on the sprocket, a half moon on the reluctor, and a line on the engine. All three should line up. If the sprocket and the engine are aligned but the reluctor isn't, that's your problem. The picture below is correct. You can just see a half moon cutout in the reluctor wheel (green arrow), directly behind the divot on the sprocket.

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I would check to see if the crank sensor it mounted securely and nothing had been disturbed down there. You may have not gotten it tight, or correctly mounted. The position of the sensor in relation the crank pulley is critical to it working correctly. ...J.D.
P0335 is set by an error signal on the crankshaft position sensor. The sensor itself is simple, but a problem with any of the wiring between the sensor and the ECM, including a poor ground, can cause problems.

When you replaced the sensor, did you use OEM or a name brand aftermarket part? I'd expect to pay $30-$40. If you paid significantly less, the part might have been too cheap and failed already.

If you have a multimeter, I'd check out the troubleshooting procedures for the crankshaft position sensor. The full factory service manual is available at tearstone.com, and the check procedures are in section 13B, page 13B-248. Skip the steps that require a special Mitsubishi scan tool.

Another thing to check is the physical connectino between the crankshaft sprocket and the crankshaft reluctor wheel. The sprocket controls the physical timing of the engine, and the reluctor controls the spark timing. Those two devices should be held tightly together and aligned with a roll pin. It's not rare for the pin to shear and then the reluctor wheel gets out of time with the sprocket. Sometimes the reluctor turns some and then jams in a new position; sometimes the reluctor spins freely. Both are bad and cause crank/no-start, even though the timing marks all line up.

You check this by removing the lower timing cover (sorry!) and inspecting the timing marks. There's a divot on the sprocket, a half moon on the reluctor, and a line on the engine. All three should line up. If the sprocket and the engine are aligned but the reluctor isn't, that's your problem. The picture below is correct. You can just see a half moon cutout in the reluctor wheel (green arrow), directly behind the divot on the sprocket.

View attachment 45987
P0335 is set by an error signal on the crankshaft position sensor. The sensor itself is simple, but a problem with any of the wiring between the sensor and the ECM, including a poor ground, can cause problems.

When you replaced the sensor, did you use OEM or a name brand aftermarket part? I'd expect to pay $30-$40. If you paid significantly less, the part might have been too cheap and failed already.

If you have a multimeter, I'd check out the troubleshooting procedures for the crankshaft position sensor. The full factory service manual is available at tearstone.com, and the check procedures are in section 13B, page 13B-248. Skip the steps that require a special Mitsubishi scan tool.

Another thing to check is the physical connectino between the crankshaft sprocket and the crankshaft reluctor wheel. The sprocket controls the physical timing of the engine, and the reluctor controls the spark timing. Those two devices should be held tightly together and aligned with a roll pin. It's not rare for the pin to shear and then the reluctor wheel gets out of time with the sprocket. Sometimes the reluctor turns some and then jams in a new position; sometimes the reluctor spins freely. Both are bad and cause crank/no-start, even though the timing marks all line up.

You check this by removing the lower timing cover (sorry!) and inspecting the timing marks. There's a divot on the sprocket, a half moon on the reluctor, and a line on the engine. All three should line up. If the sprocket and the engine are aligned but the reluctor isn't, that's your problem. The picture below is correct. You can just see a half moon cutout in the reluctor wheel (green arrow), directly behind the divot on the sprocket.

View attachment 45987
I contacted three different dealerships and was told that part # MD349080 (crankshaft position sensor) was discontinued and obsolete. So I had to use an aftermarket part at the cost of $77. I will put the car on the lift in the morning and run with your recommendations. If need I will get another sensor it has a lifetime warranty. 🙄🙄
 

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2001 Spyder GT. Koni adj.shocks. CAI, ST swaybar.17X8.5 rims. LED lighting.
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Yeh...I heard someone else tell me they could not get the OEM one. You work with what you can get. ...J.D.

AFTERTHOUGHT: You also might be able to find a similar part [under a different part number], and marry your old wiring by cutting the plug off the old one and soldering it to the new one. If you do this, I would recommend you not only solder it but use some shrink tube on the connections. ...J.D.
 

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2005 Spyder GT
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P0335 is set by an error signal on the crankshaft position sensor. The sensor itself is simple, but a problem with any of the wiring between the sensor and the ECM, including a poor ground, can cause problems.

When you replaced the sensor, did you use OEM or a name brand aftermarket part? I'd expect to pay $30-$40. If you paid significantly less, the part might have been too cheap and failed already.

If you have a multimeter, I'd check out the troubleshooting procedures for the crankshaft position sensor. The full factory service manual is available at tearstone.com, and the check procedures are in section 13B, page 13B-248. Skip the steps that require a special Mitsubishi scan tool.

Another thing to check is the physical connectino between the crankshaft sprocket and the crankshaft reluctor wheel. The sprocket controls the physical timing of the engine, and the reluctor controls the spark timing. Those two devices should be held tightly together and aligned with a roll pin. It's not rare for the pin to shear and then the reluctor wheel gets out of time with the sprocket. Sometimes the reluctor turns some and then jams in a new position; sometimes the reluctor spins freely. Both are bad and cause crank/no-start, even though the timing marks all line up.

You check this by removing the lower timing cover (sorry!) and inspecting the timing marks. There's a divot on the sprocket, a half moon on the reluctor, and a line on the engine. All three should line up. If the sprocket and the engine are aligned but the reluctor isn't, that's your problem. The picture below is correct. You can just see a half moon cutout in the reluctor wheel (green arrow), directly behind the divot on the sprocket.

View attachment 45987
You said the pic was correct, but they look slightly misaligned to me?
 

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2005 Spyder GT
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Yeh...I heard someone else tell me they could not get the OEM one. You work with what you can get. ...J.D.

AFTERTHOUGHT: You also might be able to find a similar part [under a different part number], and marry your old wiring by cutting the plug off the old one and soldering it to the new one. If you do this, I would recommend you not only solder it but use some shrink tube on the connections. ...J.D.
you are absolutely correct that the only difference in some cross platform parts is the electrical connector. I remember having to rewire a number of non-oem parts for my two MGBs. I suspect there are a lot of vintage cars still on the road thanks to such "wiring tricks."

I wouldn't, however, try that with a MAF sensor on this car since it is very unique in design and few if any non-oem manufacturers have bothered to duplicate it.
 

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You said the pic was correct, but they look slightly misaligned to me?
Maybe I could've decribed that better. My point was supposed to be that you need to check that the sprocket and reluctor are locked together and aligned with each other. So when you turn the sprocket to align it with the reference mark on the engine, the reluctor should also be aligned. In my picture, the sprocket and reluctor are perfectly aligned with each other. It's true though that both of them are slightly advanced past the TDC reference mark.
 

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2001 Spyder GT. Koni adj.shocks. CAI, ST swaybar.17X8.5 rims. LED lighting.
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Necessity is the mother of invention. I was talking to a guy in South America the other day [different website] who was trying to improvise a MAF for his Montero. Down there they have a problem with people stealing MAF's. I told him to try to find one in a wrecking yard from an old Chrysler mini-van and improvise because he cannot get the correct part down there. ...J.D.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I contacted three different dealerships and was told that part # MD349080 (crankshaft position sensor) was discontinued and obsolete. So I had to use an aftermarket part at the cost of $77. I will put the car on the lift in the morning and run with your recommendations. If need I will get another sensor it has a lifetime warranty. 🙄🙄
Well I ensured the timing belt was aligned correctly and replaced the crankshaft sensor. Haven't test drove the car yet. However, I have started two days in a row and let in run for a 1/2 each time running it at different RPMs. No issues noted. Considering prior it would die after driving it for about 8 mins in the past. Does it have to be under load?
 

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Well I ensured the timing belt was aligned correctly and replaced the crankshaft sensor. Haven't test drove the car yet. However, I have started two days in a row and let in run for a 1/2 each time running it at different RPMs. No issues noted. Considering prior it would die after driving it for about 8 mins in the past. Does it have to be under load?
well, if its running better with another new sensor, then your problem is probably solved, but you wont know for sure until you test drive it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
well, if its running better with another new sensor, then your problem is probably solved, but you wont know for sure until you test drive it.
Drove it over 50 miles with no issues. Knock on wood. Going to continue to put miles on it before I put it on trailer in April and deliver it to my son at first duty station in Nevada. Thanks to everyone for your help and patience. Go Air Force!
 
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