Mitsubishi Eclipse 3G Club banner
1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
186 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I've been searching around the forum to try and find something for cleaning the bay...I'm new here so if i'm on the wrong section of the forum, please let me know where to look but I figured this would be it. I have my '00 GT, and had a really bad radiator leak. The head spewed fluid all over my engine bay, but the owner before me also did not take good care of the car. I was just wondering if anyone has any good tips on cleaning the engine bay? I am proud of keeping my car clean, but I really don't know what to do on this one.

If anyone wants I can get pics of my engine bay, if that will help.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,752 Posts
http://www.club3g.com/forum/show-shine/126324-how-do-i-clean-my-engine.html#post2667677

To soften the grease and grunge collected on your engine compartment, start the engine, let it warm up for a few minutes and shut it off. The proper cleaning temperature of the engine is warm but not hot. If you can just hold your hand to the engine without burning it, then it is warm enough to clean. As the engine cools to proper temperature, use the time to cover the few openings on the motor that dislike ingesting water. The air intake/air filter, the distributor, the coil and the oil dipstick/breather are among the few sensitive areas.

Use plastic Baggies and rubber bands to cover the air intake/air filter(s) and the distributor/coil. Place a double layer of Baggies over the air intake and secure with a couple of rubber bands. Use a pair of two-gallon size Baggies to cover the distributor and plug wires around the distributor cap. This may be difficult to seal, but the idea is to prevent significant amounts of water possibly shorting out the distributor. If the cap is in good condition, it will be waterproof, so this is only a preventative measure. The coil is also waterproof, so Baggies are again a preventative measure. Check the tightness of the oil filler cap, the power steering filler cap, windshield washer fluid cap, oil dip stick, battery filler caps and all other engine compartment opening caps and secure baggies over them with rubber bands.

Now that your engine is warm and sealed, spray the entire engine/engine compartment with a quality, non-petroleum based degreaser. Try to start from the bottom and work up. This way you dont have the degreaser dropping on your face as you clean the underside areas. My two favorite citrus based engine cleaners are P21S Total Auto Wash and Wurth Citrus Degreaser. I find that either of these two citrus products will clean thoroughly and not harm the paint or finish of the aluminum components and are biodegradable. One note of caution, all degreasers will remove your nice coat of wax. If you get the engine cleaner on the waxed areas, plan on rewaxing. Steam clean the areas with degreaser with a minimum of 200 degrees at 60PSI.. Once the entire engine/engine compartment has been cleaned, rinse lightly with water. There is a debate as to the optimum force of spray to rinse the degreaser. If all areas are properly protected, you should have no problems with a stronger spray. If any areas need additional cleaning, repeat as necessary.

Once the engine/engine compartment is clean, immediately remove all of your plastic baggies/rubber bands. Dry any puddles and aluminum parts with a soft, 100% cotton towel. Use paper towels to thoroughly dry the battery (if it is in the engine compartment). Start the engine and allow it to warm up. This will dry the rest of the engine and evaporate any moisture that may have collected in sensitive components.

Once everything is dry and has completely cooled, you may wish to apply a coating of rubber protectant to the rubber hoses, rubber, plastic shields and rubber gaskets. One Grand Exterior Rubber & Vinyl Treatment, 3M Rubber Treatment, Meguiars #40 Vinyl/Rubber Treatment or Wurth Rubber Care Spray all work extremely well. I do not recommend treating the underside of the rubber belts, as this makes them reluctant to turn their respective pulleys, with somewhat interesting results. (This is somewhat like waxing brake pads.)

The painted areas of your engine compartment (not the engine) should be waxed. If the uncoated aluminum areas are dull or have whitish corrosion, a mild metal polish will help restore the finish. My favorite is Mother's Aluminum Mag Polish. Use a soft, microfiber towel and work a small amount into the surface and then buff off with another microfiber towel. Check the battery terminals, to insure that they are clean. If not, disconnect the cables and clean both the cable terminals and battery posts with a wire brush. Reconnect the terminals and retighten. Wurth makes a nifty Battery Terminal Spray that protects the terminals from corrosion and changes from pink to blue if there is battery acid leakage.

All of the hinges, throttle cables, cruise control cables and hood shocks should receive a thin coating of non-silicone lubricant such as Wurth HHS-2000 Spray Lube. Lastly, check all fluid levels, remove any stray Baggies and you are finished!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
186 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Oh, thanks. That works :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
:wavey:
I recently bought my 2003 GTS. The top really looks clean, but I was thinking of taking it to a steam clean company in town and having them steam the underside on a rack lift. I am not sure it even needs it.

My concerns are,

The spark plugs set down in the hole, a potential for misfire.

I heard that steam can ruin the rubber hoses.

And does disconnecting the battery cause any problems (besides the clock) on the system?

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
692 Posts
I wouldn't even worry about it. It doesn't have a under cover so even if you clean the underside it will get dirty from daily
driving. I should know I cleaned under mine when I had it jacked up and it got dirty from rain sand etc. P.S that's hella clean!:lol:
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top