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R.i.p Silverside
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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I'm doing my first brake change tommorow are there any special do's and don'ts I should know about? Also what is this part? <a href="http://photobucket.com" target="_blank"><img src="http://i266.photobucket.com/albums/ii253/kujimasun/1218071129.jpg" border="0" alt="Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket"></a>
 

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I can't see the pic, bacause I dont' have a photobucket account. Could you post the pic in a larger format?

And there aren't very many ways to mess it up.
Make sure you torque everything down to spec, wouldn't want anything vibrating loose.
Remember how it came off, it'll just fit right back together.
You might have to compress the piston(s) to fit it back over the rotor with new pads.
I recommend bleeding the brakes when you do any brake work, just for peace of mind, but its not necessary if you're not unbolting the brake line.
 

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(b)org banugee
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Those look like the anti-rattle clips Make sure you orient them properly.
 

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R.i.p Silverside
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Discussion Starter #4
Ok cool. Now I just need to replace one of them because its broken. (its the top one) I also put a bigger picture. Thank you for the info. Oh I'm also changing the O2 sensor on the passenger side can I just use wd40 to loosen it up?
 

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(b)org banugee
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There is no passenger/driver side ones -- there are front and rear ones. You will need a lot more than WD40 to get them out.
 

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When you change the brakes, basically just watch what you're doing and make sure to get things back together the same way they came apart. I'd suggest doing one side and then the other - that way if you get stuck or need to look at something, at least one side is still put together to go check out.

WD-40 is not much of a lubricant. You're going to want something like "PB Blaster", it's a lot more agressive. If you can, spray the brake bolts as well (but make sure NOT to get it onto the pads or rotors) and things will go easier for you.
 

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When you change the brakes, basically just watch what you're doing and make sure to get things back together the same way they came apart. I'd suggest doing one side and then the other - that way if you get stuck or need to look at something, at least one side is still put together to go check out.

WD-40 is not much of a lubricant. You're going to want something like "PB Blaster", it's a lot more agressive. If you can, spray the brake bolts as well (but make sure NOT to get it onto the pads or rotors) and things will go easier for you.
:agreed:

Also, by keeping one side bolted up, as you compress the piston into the first caliper, the fluid will go back into the master cylinder instead of just forcing the piston out of the caliper on the other side of the car...:bigthumb:

:woot: for PB Blaster...it freed up my rear O2 sensor!
 

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clean everything with brake cleaner, be sure to bed the pads correctly, make sure the rotors are thick enough to reuse if you're not getting new ones, just read some of the other threads and see what dumb things people have done, read some general how-to's online also or see if theres a how-to thread here in the garage section.
 

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:agreed:

Also, by keeping one side bolted up, as you compress the piston into the first caliper, the fluid will go back into the master cylinder instead of just forcing the piston out of the caliper on the other side of the car...:bigthumb:

:woot: for PB Blaster...it freed up my rear O2 sensor!
I never thought of where the fluid went when you compressed the piston... lol.
I always did one side at a time anyway, just because :wiggle:thats how I roll. :rofl:
Thats actually a good point, and has to be thought of when determining where your brake fluid went. I was really suprised how very little brake fluid is contained in the system as a whole. I put clear "synthetic" brake fluid when I swapped out the rear drums to disc, and it only took like 2 pumps/bleeds to get clear out the back. Like probably an 8th of a cup for both back brakes.
 

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in a perfect world you're supposed to open the bleeder to push the old fluid out of the caliper. pushing fluid backwards *can* do damage to some ABS systems, some proportioning valves, and even some master cylinders. also, you get fresh fluid into the system when you do it this way since you change pads more often than you think to change your brake fluid, which should be every 2 years regardless of mileage or the color. brake fluid absorbs water over time, the boiling point gets lower, and it can become acidic and eat away the rubber parts of the system, also the cap has a vent on it, so in dusty areas dirt will get into the fluid and can cause erosive wear to the brake system parts, very bad.
 

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R.i.p Silverside
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Discussion Starter #11
Thank you. I'll make sure to pick up brake cleaner and I'm glad someone mentioned brake fluid I need to take some out. When my brake light was turning on and off I added brake fluid. About a week later my squealer started going off, that's when it dawned on me I needed new brakes.
 
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