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Just like any other fluid in your car, the power steering fluid gets contaminated, and needs to be replaced at some point. I think synthetic fluids are superior and wanted to have it in my power steering system as well. Power steering is a simple hydraulic system. But changing the fluid is not so simple. You cannot just drain and refill, like your engine, since the reservoir only holds a small amount of the systems total capacity. Out of the total 28 ounces, only 6 oz. will be in the reservoir.

Like any hydraulic system, air is the enemy. It will be a lot less work at the end, if you can keep air out of the system. Just like the brake system in your car. If air is not completely removed, there will be abnormal noises from the pump and the fluid can become aerated. This condition could reduce the life of the pump and other power steering components.

I do not claim that the procedure I have outlined here is the only way. It is just the way I successfully completed it. Therefore, I cannot be held liable for the use or misuse of this information. In other words, you follow this procedure at your own risk.

Preparation;

You will need at least 2 quarts of automatic transmission fluid to completely flush and refill the power steering system. Mitsubishi recommends Diamond ATF. I used a high quality synthetic ATF. You will also need about 4 feet of hose to extend the return hose on the car, down to an oil drain pan. I purchased some cheap vinyl hose at the local home improvement store. If you get something with a 5/8” inside diameter, it will fit snugly over the return hose.

Raise and support the car so the front wheels are off the ground.

Move the coolant recovery tank. Just lift straight up and it will come off of its mounting bracket. It does not need to be disconnected, as the engine will not be running during this procedure.







The return hose, circled in red in the following picture, will need to be disconnected from the reservoir and redirected into an oil drain pan.







Unbolt the reservoir.







Lift the power steering reservoir up from behind the coolant recovery tank mounting bracket.







Remove the cap and pour out just enough fluid so the level is below the return hose connection on the reservoir.







Warning! The next 2 steps should be performed as quickly as possible to reduce oil from spilling. Have the plug and the extension hose ready.

Disconnect the return hose and plug the port on the reservoir where the hose was removed.







Install the extension hose over the return hose and lead it into the drain pan. The connection should not be loose. The hose I used fit tightly and did not need any clamps. The fluid coming out will not be under any pressure; it will just drain out slowly.









Refill the reservoir with fresh fluid.







Disconnect the Crankshaft Position Sensor. You do not want the engine to start. Even at idle speed, the pump will run too fast. You will run the pump dry and pull air into the system. VERY BAD!








The Procedure;

While operating the starter motor, turn the steering wheel all the way to the left and right several times within 10 to 15 seconds. This will reduce the level in the reservoir to the point that it will need to be refilled. It will be best if you have someone to help you. Do not let the fluid level drop too low. Refill the reservoir and repeat this step until you are satisfied with the condition of the fluid exiting the system. I pumped just over a quart through my system. Finish this operation leaving the reservoir almost empty. This will make it easier to reconnect the return hose to the reservoir.







Reattach the return hose back onto the reservoir.







Mount the reservoir back onto the chassis.







Refill the system and start the car. Don’t forget to plug the CPS back in, and return the coolant recovery tank to its original position. With the engine idling, turn the steering wheel all the way to the left and right several times. Top off the fluid level one last time, and your done.

Check the difference of the fluid level while the engine is running, and when it is stopped. If the change of the fluid level is 0.2 inch or more, you have air in the system. Continue bleeding the system with the engine idling. Turn the steering wheel all the way to the left and right until there are no more air bubbles in the reservoir.

Happy motoring.
 

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got a question. what is the black thing behind your coolant reservoir? mine is missing, and there IS a plug-in AND mount for it. just wanna know what it is?
 

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Just like any other fluid in your car, the power steering fluid gets contaminated, and needs to be replaced at some point. I think synthetic fluids are superior and wanted to have it in my power steering system as well. Power steering is a simple hydraulic system. But changing the fluid is not so simple. You cannot just drain and refill, like your engine, since the reservoir only holds a small amount of the systems total capacity. Out of the total 28 ounces, only 6 oz. will be in the reservoir.

Like any hydraulic system, air is the enemy. It will be a lot less work at the end, if you can keep air out of the system. Just like the brake system in your car. If air is not completely removed, there will be abnormal noises from the pump and the fluid can become aerated. This condition could reduce the life of the pump and other power steering components.

I do not claim that the procedure I have outlined here is the only way. It is just the way I successfully completed it. Therefore, I cannot be held liable for the use or misuse of this information. In other words, you follow this procedure at your own risk.

Preparation;

You will need at least 2 quarts of automatic transmission fluid to completely flush and refill the power steering system. Mitsubishi recommends Diamond ATF. I used a high quality synthetic ATF. You will also need about 4 feet of hose to extend the return hose on the car, down to an oil drain pan. I purchased some cheap vinyl hose at the local home improvement store. If you get something with a 5/8” inside diameter, it will fit snugly over the return hose.

Raise and support the car so the front wheels are off the ground.

Move the coolant recovery tank. Just lift straight up and it will come off of its mounting bracket. It does not need to be disconnected, as the engine will not be running during this procedure.







The return hose, circled in red in the following picture, will need to be disconnected from the reservoir and redirected into an oil drain pan.







Unbolt the reservoir.







Lift the power steering reservoir up from behind the coolant recovery tank mounting bracket.







Remove the cap and pour out just enough fluid so the level is below the return hose connection on the reservoir.







Warning! The next 2 steps should be performed as quickly as possible to reduce oil from spilling. Have the plug and the extension hose ready.

Disconnect the return hose and plug the port on the reservoir where the hose was removed.







Install the extension hose over the return hose and lead it into the drain pan. The connection should not be loose. The hose I used fit tightly and did not need any clamps. The fluid coming out will not be under any pressure; it will just drain out slowly.









Refill the reservoir with fresh fluid.







Disconnect the Crankshaft Position Sensor. You do not want the engine to start. Even at idle speed, the pump will run too fast. You will run the pump dry and pull air into the system. VERY BAD!








The Procedure;

While operating the starter motor, turn the steering wheel all the way to the left and right several times within 10 to 15 seconds. This will reduce the level in the reservoir to the point that it will need to be refilled. It will be best if you have someone to help you. Do not let the fluid level drop too low. Refill the reservoir and repeat this step until you are satisfied with the condition of the fluid exiting the system. I pumped just over a quart through my system. Finish this operation leaving the reservoir almost empty. This will make it easier to reconnect the return hose to the reservoir.







Reattach the return hose back onto the reservoir.







Mount the reservoir back onto the chassis.







Refill the system and start the car. Don’t forget to plug the CPS back in, and return the coolant recovery tank to its original position. With the engine idling, turn the steering wheel all the way to the left and right several times. Top off the fluid level one last time, and your done.

Check the difference of the fluid level while the engine is running, and when it is stopped. If the change of the fluid level is 0.2 inch or more, you have air in the system. Continue bleeding the system with the engine idling. Turn the steering wheel all the way to the left and right until there are no more air bubbles in the reservoir.

Happy motoring.
 
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