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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
MITSUBISHI ECLIPSE 3G LED RADIO CONVESION
Alright, so your bored of your stock radio color and want to do something about it, you can paint the bulbs, or color the plastic that lights up the buttons, but your a car enthusiast and you want to do it the right way.
Items you need

Single din Infinity radio from 3g Eclipse
Phillips screwdriver, 1 large 1 small
Pliers Preferably Jewelers
Nail clippers or wire cutters
Tweezers
Solder
Soldering Iron
Soldering Flux
Some intelligence
L.E.D.'s
Resistors rated for the led you are using.

You can use this site for a calculator LED calculator for single LEDs

L.E.D RESISTOR RATINGS BY COLOR
RED: 1.8-2.2v/24mA max, needs 560ohM 1/2watt resistor
ORANGE: 1.8-2.2v/24mA, needs 560ohM 1/2watt resistor
YELLOW: 1.8-2.2v/24mA, needs 560ohM 1/2watt resistor

Green: 3.0-3.4v/24mA max, needs 470ohM 1/2watt resistor
Blue: 3.0-3.4v/24mA max, needs 470ohM 1/2watt resistor
White: 3.0-3.2v/24mA max, needs 470ohM 1/2watt resistor
Warm White: 3.0-3.4v/24mA max, needs 470ohM 1/2watt resistor
Pink: 3.0-3.4v/24mA max, needs 470ohM 1/2watt resistor

First you want to remove the two screws in the bottom of the bezel (see red circles)


Then pull it away from the dash board like this.


Now reach inside from the top and push the hazard button toward you popping it out.


Disconnect the harness and set the bezel and button to the side.


Now unscrew the 4 screws that hold the radio and cubby in the dash.


Disconnect the cables to the back of the radio, when reinstalling after your one make sure you push the antenna cables in as far as you can you should use some force for this.


Once that is done there are 2 screws on each side of the radio that need to come out and once they are you can take the radio to your work area.


The radio will have 3 clips on the top, 3 on the bottom and 1 on each side of the black faceplate. pop those with a small screwdriver or tweezers and remove the face plate from the bulk of the radio.


Now it is time to remove the 5 small screws from the Printed Circuit Board (PCB), and pull the 2 knobs off the front, the volume and the channel select button.


now pull the board out and you will see 4 bulbs on black bases, remove them, now normally I would never suggest using brute force to remove components from a PCB but I did this and see no cause for not doing it. Take the pliers and grip the base of the bulb holder (black plastic) and twist them off. Once all 4 are off you can take your soldering iron and solder and add some solder to each of the 8 contact points there. (when removing the bulbs they may shatter and go flying everywhere so wear eye protection) once you add solder if you have any small wires left over from twisting off the bulb apply the soldering iron and with pliers or tweezers pull the wires out and discard them. touch up your contact points and we are now finished with prep of the PCB. Now its time to prep our LED's for placement.



An LED has a long leg (anode) and a short leg (cathode), the long leg is the + and the short leg is the - or ground. The resistors don't do not have a polarity they can be soldered with either leg it won't make a difference, but for a professional look install them with the colors going to same direction.


I experimented with 2 ways of placing the resistors to the LED's and found that placing the resistor under the LED and not next to it will work better and allow for a cleaner more fluid flow of lighting. but either way will work. I did notice that my seek and 1,2,3, buttons were dim compared to the rest once done with the conversion this is either from a short i probably knocked it off its solder base or its the resistor blocking light in that area or the LED is mounted to high from the PCB.



Once you finish prep work on your LED's, when it comes time to solder them to the PCB you will want them as close to the PCB as possible, I was actually able to get the resistor to sit on the PCB and about a mm of post to solder it was difficult but very possible. Once you solder your 4 LED's in place test fit them into the face plate housing, and once your satisfied you can begin to follow the disassembly steps in reverse to put it all back together. (I would test the radio with the connectors and power source to check for lighting before you zip it all back together. PAY ATTENTION TO POLARITY IF YOU HAVE SOMETHING BACKWARDS IT WILL NOT HURT ANYTHING, BUT CONGRATS YOU JUST CREATED A D.E.D. (DARK EMITTING DIODE, actual term lol) reverse polarity and it should be ok.
]


The end result




Enjoy your new bling. Any questions email me but put them in the forum so i don't get duplicate questions and can just respond to them once, I don't check forums everyday so email but put in forum i'll ge back at you.
Thanks,
Shon
 

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Actually you only need 2 resistors because the bulbs are wired in serial pairs.
I used 2 220ohm resistors and 4 blue leds.
This is a diagram I made of the bulb wiring.

[/URL][/IMG]
 

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Titanium Spork
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Actually you only need 2 resistors because the bulbs are wired in serial pairs.
I used 2 220ohm resistors and 4 blue leds.
This is a diagram I made of the bulb wiring.

[/URL][/IMG]
sounds like you did it TOTALLY different than him. he put 1 led, and 1 resistor per bulb, and soldered them in place of the bulbs. you wired your led's together. both are acceptable. actually yours is better if you get bi or tri color LEDs, cause you can switch your glow's color with an external switch (what i have been thinking of doing)
 

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No, I did the same thing. That diagram is for the bulb wiring on the actual PCB board.
As you can see 2 leds are soldered directly to the board and only 2 leds use resistors.

[/URL][/IMG]
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
Actually you only need 2 resistors because the bulbs are wired in serial pairs.
I used 2 220ohm resistors and 4 blue leds.
This is a diagram I made of the bulb wiring.

[/URL][/IMG]
Yes they are in series but only 2 each are in series and they all share the same common ground, I wasn't getting super technical because if you really wanted a really professional way you turn the board over to the back side and you will see 2 sets of 3 smd resistors remove those and replace with a bigger resistor that will be rated the same as the 3 + 2 leds (you would have to do this to each 12v trace so just duplicate, then you would not need resistors on leds at all, i do think there are room for 5mm bulbs but ididn't have any on hand to test, resistors are cheap and i figured its just easier to have all them with resistors than not. I do believe that the 3 smd resistors on each 12v trace add up to 210ohM but i cannot remember they are SMD 101 (2) and 121, so you can search. In one of the pics i believe i had a cold solder with the led that lights up the 1,2,3, and seek buttons but it was 330am and i was tired in my car in this ohio winter crap. Its just an easy how to for those who couldn't figure out that they were running in series. But it is a bit harder to do but will work out nice is to put the resistors under the bulbs imo, i like everything to be compact and they won't get too hot.
Also i'm not sure if i mentioned i used flat top 3mm wide LED's for this. due to the dynamics of the plastic bezel and what not the light actually needs to go sideways more than from the top
 

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Good how-to! :yesway:

Hey, why didn't you mount the resistor horizontally instead of vertically?? That would block less of the LED light

Also, i would recheck that dim area. Take off the circuit board and plug it straight in, so you can see what's going on. I thinks its just not working.

Oh about the SMD resistors, i thought about that but its hard to find resistors that can handle the wattage. They are just too weak from what i researched. Can you link me to some if you have found a type that could work?
 

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I do believe that the 3 smd resistors on each 12v trace add up to 210ohM but i cannot remember they are SMD 101 (2) and 121
The smd resistor values are correct; however, they add up to about 35.3 ohms because those resistors are in parallel.
Personally I believe it's easier soldering 2 regular resistors than replacing 6 smds with 2 new regular/smd resistors.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Good how-to! :yesway:

Hey, why didn't you mount the resistor horizontally instead of vertically?? That would block less of the LED light

Also, i would recheck that dim area. Take off the circuit board and plug it straight in, so you can see what's going on. I thinks its just not working.

Oh about the SMD resistors, i thought about that but its hard to find resistors that can handle the wattage. They are just too weak from what i researched. Can you link me to some if you have found a type that could work?
If you would have read I already addressed both issues, I was showing 2 ways to mount the resistors but i suggest the horizontal, the dim area was me knockin the led loose it was almost 4am i wanted to be done, and if you want to get rid of the resistors you can mount them on the back of the pcb remove the origional SMD resistors and replace with enough resistance to not blow your leds. but thanks. ps it was like 12 degrees outside when i was in the car messing around in the late hours.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 · (Edited)
The smd resistor values are correct; however, they add up to about 35.3 ohms because those resistors are in parallel.
Personally I believe it's easier soldering 2 regular resistors than replacing 6 smds with 2 new regular/smd resistors.
I was just posing that as a hypothetical, I didn't have the time and the reistors were just layin around so I did it that way. I also believe you could use 5mm flat top wide led's they should fit, but these were plenty bright enough, I think you can find SMD Resistors on ebay they are smaller than 802 size my digital calipers are without batteries at the moment and the newer smd resistors can handle 12v power, what do you think is in your laptops and ludicrous gaming rigs these days, smd resistors. so you would basically need to add another 220ohm's per trace in resistance to what is already there, because the LED's are in parallel, mine was a little overkill but they function fine and are plenty bright.

Although I wonder if you put in 3 new smd's per trace like a 1kohM, and 2 1.8kohM if that would be sufficient to keep the leds happy for years to come? the total parallel resistance is about 531.82 whats your thought? It would make installing the LED' a breeze and turn a 20min project into a 7 min project.
 

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R.i.p Silverside
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If you use Leds that are rated at 12 volts do you still have to use resistors? I don't know much about resistors and such, be gentle.
 

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if i use the same 3mm wide, flat top leds can you tell me exactly what resistor i need? this is my first time doing this sort of thing, so i want to do it right.
 

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please HELP ME!! so i changed out the lights and did everything according to the instructions above. i soldered correctly, used resistors and made sure everything was correct(ie: soldering, making sure the resistors were correct, etc). once everything was done and soldered in, i plugged it in and only 2 lights lit up!(the ones above both the volume and channel scan knobs) the 2 middle lights arent working! i even bought new bulbs to see if that was the problem and it wasnt. i removed the lights that were working and plugged in different lights to make sure i did everything correctly, and they worked.. so why arent the middle ones working?! :( PLEASE HELP!
 

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FeelsGoodToBeGangsta
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Are they facing the correct way? Polarity wise? You probably installed them with the leads soldered oppositely
 
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