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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
It was a day off when I had went to my local gas station, which I trust, to get some mid grade fuel to fill up my 05 GS 3G. I had decided to go ahead and pour in the rest of my octane booster along with the fuel and the remainder of my marvel mystery oil. I start up my car and with a bit of misfire my A/C quits working and starts grinding. Oh no.
I did some research here and there and after some looking around online and in stores I found a condenser and compressor at a good price. After ordering them to come in I looked into how to do the job I am about to undertake. It seemed daunting at first because I don't know a lot about A/C systems, but things got a little clearer as I learned what needed replacing and how to go about it; Thankfully I had most of the tools for the job.
Once my parts arrived it was only a matter of getting down to doing the job. I saw on tearstone that you should take off the front bumper; however once done I didn't see a way to take out the condenser from the front side, so I was going to have to do it from the inside by taking out the radiator first. so I drained the radiator into a large green pan and pulled it out with the fan assembly still attached and then got to taking out the condenser. What gave me the most trouble was the bushing bolts that keep the condenser in its place: such a pain in the a** taking them out and putting them back in.
Once I had gotten the condenser out it was night and I needed to put my newly ordered one in. This was difficult because some of the parts were bent (bottom mounting studs, bushing holders, wire holder). When I had finally gotten the condenser settled finally I had to get the radiator back in and fitted properly. I reconnected the two hoses, mounted it back into place, and poured in fresh green antifreeze. I may have to bleed the system of air later.
The next part was doing the compressor! The A/C compressor is held in by four mounting bolts, the A/C hoses, and the serpentine belt. This was a lot easier to take out and replace with the new compressor than the condenser: Plus having the bumper off made this easier. Once I had done all of this I put the bumper back on and am calling it a day for now.

Is there any recommendations or concerns about what to do with the system before I vacuum and put in new r134a. The compressor already came prefilled with pag 46 oil. Advice would be invaluable at this point because I don't want to break my new parts.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Update*
I wanted to get this professionally done, but the professionals left me no choice other than waiting (and I don't like to wait). So I made a vacuum in my system with a pump, had it keep the vacuum for 30 minutes to suck out any air or moisture, and then charged it my self. Car is blowing cold air!=
 

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It was a day off when I had went to my local gas station, which I trust, to get some mid grade fuel to fill up my 05 GS 3G. I had decided to go ahead and pour in the rest of my octane booster along with the fuel and the remainder of my marvel mystery oil. I start up my car and with a bit of misfire my A/C quits working and starts grinding. Oh no.
I did some research here and there and after some looking around online and in stores I found a condenser and compressor at a good price. After ordering them to come in I looked into how to do the job I am about to undertake. It seemed daunting at first because I don't know a lot about A/C systems, but things got a little clearer as I learned what needed replacing and how to go about it; Thankfully I had most of the tools for the job.
Once my parts arrived it was only a matter of getting down to doing the job. I saw on tearstone that you should take off the front bumper; however once done I didn't see a way to take out the condenser from the front side, so I was going to have to do it from the inside by taking out the radiator first. so I drained the radiator into a large green pan and pulled it out with the fan assembly still attached and then got to taking out the condenser. What gave me the most trouble was the bushing bolts that keep the condenser in its place: such a pain in the a** taking them out and putting them back in.
Once I had gotten the condenser out it was night and I needed to put my newly ordered one in. This was difficult because some of the parts were bent (bottom mounting studs, bushing holders, wire holder). When I had finally gotten the condenser settled finally I had to get the radiator back in and fitted properly. I reconnected the two hoses, mounted it back into place, and poured in fresh green antifreeze. I may have to bleed the system of air later.
The next part was doing the compressor! The A/C compressor is held in by four mounting bolts, the A/C hoses, and the serpentine belt. This was a lot easier to take out and replace with the new compressor than the condenser: Plus having the bumper off made this easier. Once I had done all of this I put the bumper back on and am calling it a day for now.

Is there any recommendations or concerns about what to do with the system before I vacuum and put in new r134a. The compressor already came prefilled with pag 46 oil. Advice would be invaluable at this point because I don't want to break my new parts.
I highly recommend that you replace the expansion valve. It is located on the firewall. This will insure that your new compressor does not fail early. I replaced these parts a few months ago on my 2004 Mitsubishi Eclipse Spyder GTS and the A/C blows at 33°F now. Better than it ever had been before. The expansion valve is attached to the evaporator core in the dash. I did not replace my evaporator, I only cleaned it. Overall I replaced the compressor, condenser and expansion valve and now it is feaking awesome!. I purchased the parts from rockauto.com. I think the expansion valve costs $6.33 plus tax and shipping. I remember that I replaced everything and had the car back on the road for under $300.00.

Once I had the car back together, I pulled a vacuum on the system and then filled it with R134A.

I hope this helps.

Fergie91
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I highly recommend that you replace the expansion valve. It is located on the firewall. This will insure that your new compressor does not fail early. I replaced these parts a few months ago on my 2004 Mitsubishi Eclipse Spyder GTS and the A/C blows at 33°F now. Better than it ever had been before. The expansion valve is attached to the evaporator core in the dash. I did not replace my evaporator, I only cleaned it. Overall I replaced the compressor, condenser and expansion valve and now it is feaking awesome!. I purchased the parts from rockauto.com. I think the expansion valve costs $6.33 plus tax and shipping. I remember that I replaced everything and had the car back on the road for under $300.00.

Once I had the car back together, I pulled a vacuum on the system and then filled it with R134A.

I hope this helps.

Fergie91
There's an expansion valve?! Shoot, that is probably why it isn't blowing as cold as it could.
 

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There's an expansion valve?! Shoot, that is probably why it isn't blowing as cold as it could.
In order to find the expansion valve, just follow the metal A/C lines up to where they connect to the firewall. That is where the hoses actually connect directly to the expansion valve. You will need a 10mm wrench or socket and an Allen wrench. I think it was a 4mm but I may be wrong about that.

I hope this helps.

Fergie91
 
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