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3M's tiny projector that will work for cell phones, digital cameras, etc.
For several years people have been talking about the idea of miniaturizing a projector so that it's small enough to fit inside a cell phone or digital camera. Now it's finally been done, and 3M is demonstrating a prototype of such a device at this year's International Consumer Electronics Show.

The mobile projector is about a centimeter thick and about 4 centimeters tall by 3 centimeters wide -- small enough to fit inside portable devices like cell phones, PDAs or a digital still camera, said Todd Rutherford, product development specialist with 3M's optical systems division.

It uses an LED as the light source and can project a VGA resolution (640 pixels by 480 pixels) image through a lens that's about a centimeter in diameter.

3M is demonstrating the projector at CES built into a small handheld device that runs video from flash memory. The image projected onto walls or other light surfaces was good enough and easy enough to see over a distance of about half a meter, although it suffered over greater distances due to the bright lights of the show floor.

The demo attracted a lot of attention and a constant stream of show attendees, many of whom had badges identifying them as employees of mobile phone makers or network operators.

3M is already working with companies interested in embedding the projector in devices, and the first products should be out in early 2008, said Rutherford. He wouldn't identify the companies or the applications but said that they are mobile consumer electronics products.

Wireless Nunchuck for Nintendo Wii

(Credit: Nyko)

The Nintendo Wii uses a wireless remote to begin with, but that remote still manages to use a cord half the time. Most Wii games use both the Wii Remote and the Wii Nunchuck, an analog stick peripheral that plugs into the base of the remote via a long cable. Nyko first cut the Wii cord with the Wireless Sensor Bar and is taking away yet another tether with the Wireless Nunchuck.

The Nyko Wireless Nunchuck connects to the Wiimote via a little wireless dongle that clicks into the controller's accessory jack. Once plugged in, tapping the connection buttons on the dongle and the Nunchuck syncs them together, letting the Nunchuck work as if it was physically connected to the remote. The Nunchuck runs on two AAA batteries, which Nyko claims can provide up to 30 hours of gameplay. It has all the same features as the original Nunchuck, including analog stick, C and Z buttons, and even an accelerometer for games that use the Nunchuck for motion controls.

I spent a few minutes playing with the wireless Nunchuck, and it feels very much like the original. The shape is nearly identical to the corded Wii Nunchuck, and it sits comfortably in the hand. I'm not sure if it will work with the Wii Zapper, but since the Zapper lets you stash the cord inside it anyway, it's not that important a feature. The wireless dongle only measures an inch or so and keeps the same profile as the remote itself, so it doesn't feel too different from using a bare Wiimote or a Wiimote and corded Nunchuck.

The Nyko Wireless Nunchuck ships in late January/early February and will retail for about $30.

Cheap 4GB MP3 player from SanDisk

(Credit: SanDisk)

What's this? A 4GB MP3 player for just $79? Nope, I'm not playing a cruel joke on you. SanDisk has just added the new capacity to its rather fabulous Sansa Clip line. The new version comes in a universally appealing brushed silver body with a mirrored face, and it offers all the features of its brethren, which is to say quite a few. Of course, you get the built-in removable belt clip, the super compact form factor, and the support for WMA subscription services and Audible tracks. There's also an FM tuner with an autoscan function and up to 40 preset slots, as well as a built-in mic for making voice recordings. I also expect the same impressive audio quality from the 4GB Clip, as only the memory--not the audio chip--is different.


Ooo...shiny!

(Credit: CNET Networks/Donald Bell)


What you won't find here is a color screen or any of the amenities that are inherent to such a feature. That means no photo or video viewing, or album art support. Considering the price point, this is entirely understandable. It's also why the Clip makes an excellent choice as a secondary MP3 player (such as for use at the gym) or for first-time MP3 player owners who want something easy to use without making a big investment.

New video glasses

(Credit: MyVu)

It has to be said: I cannot WAIT to model these suckers for you on camera. I mean, just look at them! Tell me that this is not exactly what leapt to your mind back in the early 90s when you first started dreaming about the time when video glasses would rule the personal entertainment marketplace. Now, that time hasn't quite arrived yet, but MyVu is sure aiming to make it so. The company offers a line of Personal Media Viewers in the form of glasses that hook up to an external video source (such as an iPod) to provide the illusion of watching the content on a large screen from several feet away. Generally speaking, this means less eye-strain than you would get from viewing for long periods on a 3-inch screen.

The latest PMV to join MyVu's lineup is the Crystal Edition, an orange-lensed set that is certainly sweeter-looking than its predecessors. The Crystal also a 35 percent increase in the field of view over existing PMV models, which allows for better quality and a more immersive viewing experience. Another difference is the transparent lenses, which opens the glasses up to other applications...after all, who wouldn't want to sport these beauts as their daily shades? Keep an eye out for the Crystal in spring of 2008.
 

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Engadget said:
Hands-on with Creative's inPerson video calling device


We were already quite aware that Creative would be pimping its inPerson here at CES, so it wasn't exactly a chore to grab a few hands-on pics when we dropped by the booth. No real surprises or anything, but be sure and hit the gallery below to see it doin' its thang.
Engadget said:
Hands-on with Hitachi's 1.5-inch thin displays

Hitachi's 1.5-inch thick LCD displaysNot to be outdone by what's shaping up to be the theme of the show when it comes to display technology this year, Hitachi launched their line of thin displays in 32-, 37-, and 42-inch sizes. Hitachi's 1.5-inch LCD displays may not match Pioneer or Panasonic in the sheer (lack of) depth column, but you will actually be able to buy these sets when they launch in the first part of 2008. And that's something impressive all by itself.

Engadget said:
Hands-off with Panasonic's 150-inch behemoth



The odd disappointment of seeing a 150-inch plasma display is that it hardly looks like a TV "set" in the traditional sense. It just looks like a wall of video. But after your eyes adjust to the sensory overload, it's truly a beautiful thing. The 4k resolution of the set was clearly stretching the source material, but everything still looked pretty sharp, blacks were black and motion was smooth. We chatted with a Panny rep who said this won't be out until 2009, but we slipped him a fiver and he promised to meet us out back with one of these after the show.

Engadget said:
Hands-on with Dell's Crystal 22-inch LCD



You've read the specs, you know the price ($1199 ... ouch), but what you really want to know is what it looks like in real life. Well, we've traveled down that avenue dear reader, and stared the Dell Crystal 22" LCD monitor straight in its display and not only have we lived to tell the tale, but we managed to snag a gallery illustrating some of the more attractive pieces of this display.

Engadget said:
Hands-off with Guitar Wizard, the real guitar Guitar Hero




All you grumps unable to appreciate the pleasures provided by plastic instruments coupled to a gaming console were undoubtedly thrilled when we told you about the Guitar Wizard (because Heroes are zeros, right?). We stopped by at CES and, while they weren't going to let us shred on their setup (which is a good thing, unless their faces were meltproof), we did snag some pics and video along with some more details on the product. It's shipping sometime in August or this Fall for about $150 for the MIDI controller and software package, or $300 for the whole package which includes a real Washburn guitar.


Engadget said:
Alienware curved display rocks Crysis at 2880 x 900




Don't get all frothed up quite yet because it's still only a prototype, but this sweet doublewide curved DLP display with LED illumination from Alienware will reportedly be available in the second half of '08. The curvature of the 2880 x 900 rez screen mimics peripheral vision, and in action the performance seemed pretty flawless to our Crysis-dazzled eyes (official specs report less than .02-millisecond response time). We did notice three faint vertical dividing lines that appeared to indicate four sub-panels making up this screen, but we may be willing to suspend disbelief in exchange for the potential of indulgent wrap-around immersion. There's not even an inkling of an MSRP on this thing yet, but you know we're gonna be keeping our eyes on this sucker for ya. Pics below and don't miss our video footage.

 

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Dell Monitor is hot. Whats the silver things on the side? speakers perhaps?

Not sure about the Alienware curved display. I like more up/down vision
 

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Wut Wut In Da Butt
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Bill's last day in Microsoft? :scratch: Is that a joke? Or is he retiring?


:lol: The vid is funny though.
 

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Dell Monitor is hot. Whats the silver things on the side? speakers perhaps?

Not sure about the Alienware curved display. I like more up/down vision
That Dell looks like they just glued an oversized piece of glass to an LCD monitor. :dunno:
 

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That Dell looks like they just glued an oversized piece of glass to an LCD monitor. :dunno:
all LCD/TV screens I have seen, have a "border" around the outside of the screen then the glass. This LCD doesnt have the "border"

like so
 

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Discussion Starter #13
All I want from CES are impression reports and specs on the Mitsubishi Laser DLP.
No specs have been made available yet. And we probably won't get any from CES.

http://ces.cnet.com/8301-13855_1-9845414-67.html?tag=head
<div style="float: right; margin: 5px;">

Mitsubishi's trio of laser TVs hang on the wall.
(Credit: Mitsubishi)
</div>While rear-projection seems to be losing steam, Mitsubishi is doing its best to breathe new life into non-flat HDTVs with its introduction of the world's first model with a picture powered by a laser-based light engine. Unfortunately, the product's smoke-and-hyperbole-filled introduction at the Palms hotel's Rain nightclub, while long on lighting effects, was short on details. Pricing and available screen sizes were not announced -- only that the product will hit the market this year.

According to the press release, the laser light engine allows the TV to produce twice the color spectrum of current HDTVs. The brief demo provided little opportunity to test this claim, although black levels looked dark enough (albeit crushed -- lacking shadow detail, which was probably a result of improper calibration) and off-angle viewing appeared better than other DLPs'. The company presenter mentioned that lasers were extremely bright, and the demonstration models at the event were also quite thin, so the laser TV will be wall-mount capable.

We first reported on this technology nearly two years ago, so in lieu of updated details on laser TV we'll quote from that blog post regarding more potential benefits, according to the company at the time. "Compared to current DLP HDTVs, the most promising aspect of the technology seems to be its ability to deliver deeper blacks. Current lamp-driven projection technologies require the lamp to be permanently switched on, which can cause internal reflections and other issues that contribute to a lighter shade of black onscreen. Since the lasers switch off entirely, they have the potential to create a pure black, according to the company. Mitsubishi also claims that the laser light source can produce better color, is more efficient, and has an essentially 'permanent' life span, as opposed to the bulb, which needs to be replaced every 3,000 hours or so in standard DLPs. [Most] current DLPs also use a color wheel that can introduce rainbows, artifacts that the three-color lasers would likely eliminate or greatly reduce."

Attending press were also treated to a demo of the set's 3-D capability, which relied on a pair of shuttered glasses and looked very impressive across a variety of custom content. A rep for RealD, the company behind the technology, mentioned that production was a significant hurdle for 3-D content because live-action material had to be either shot with 3-D in mind (a two-camera shoot) or 3-D-ified after the fact by hand -- a process much more laborious than colorization of black-and-white films, for example. Computer-generated content, on the other hand, lends itself much more readily to 3-D.

Further details regarding the Mitsubishi laser TV will probably be released at the company's line show in May, probably via the apparently faith-based web site believingisseeing.tv.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Watch Phones from LG

LG watch phone
(Credit: Nicole Lee/CNET Networks)


Sure, it's not quite the one that Dick Tracy had, but LG showed off a prototype model of a watch phone here at CES. It sat behind a display case the whole time, but we did snag a few details about it: it will have Bluetooth, as well as text messaging. When asked how you would text message with it, the LG rep said that there's a scroll wheel at the bottom of the watch's face that'll let you scroll through letters and numbers. This sounds horrendously tedious, but at least making calls promises to be a bit easier--just pair it with a Bluetooth headset, and dial numbers using your voice. We have no other details other than that, though, and this is simply, as we said, a prototype.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
I've been looking around the net for any new Canon news from CES :( Nothing. I guess I'll wait for the PMA.
The only piece of news I've found on Canon... but it's from MacWorld.


Canon Unveils New AVCHD Camcorders


Edit: Oh, here we go, some CES stuff...

Canon Debuts 3 New HD Camcorders at CES

The most exciting cameras at CES (so far)…

Casio Exilim Pro EX-F1
Another standout at the show is the Casio Exilim Pro EX-F1, a pricey 6-megapixel megazoom camera. It will set you back a whopping $1,000 (yep, The most exciting cameras at CES (so far)…more than Sony’s DSLR!), but the EX-F1’s unique hook is its ultra-high-speed burst shooting capabilities rated at (an also whopping) 60 frames per second at full resolution. Taking a page from the cool Past Movie mode introduced in a number of Casio models a few years ago, the camera also pre-records still images into a continuously recording buffer. You not only capture images when you press the shutter button, but you even have a chance to capture images from before you press the button. Using the super-fast burst function to pre-record still images, you can save a maximum of 60 images into the buffer memory. A Slow Motion view function then lets you play back the saved images in–you guessed it–slow motion, so you can select the exact moment you want to grab your photo. Sounds like just the ticket for folks who often shoot sporting events. Other great features include high-speed movie recording at an unheard of 1,200 frames per second, and full HD movie recording at 1920×1080 pixels.
 

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08/05/2008
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Thanks Glenn. I've been reading all tidbits of info and they really didn't give any specs (contrast ratio, refresh rate, power consumption, price, etc). The few impressions I've read are positive but a couple of the articles I've read state that they will be more expensive than comparable sized LCD and Plasma which just pisses me off.

1) If they are going to be more expensive than LCD and Plasma at the large screen sizes (say 55" and up) they are going to be prohibitively expensive.

2) Currently RPTV is dying and the major reason is the thinness of their major competition and bulb changes, not the quality of image. To provide a great looking image at 10"+ thick is still going to be a hard sell of being wall mountable. To regain some of the market share they need to offer a better quality picture, be cheaper, and rectify the bulb issue (which from all reports going to laser will do).

3) I really really really wanted to own one. :eek:
 

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video :lol:
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Well, hopefully they'll be priced competitively with LCD, Plasma, and DLPs. Otherwise, it would be a hard sell.

The article does say that the TVs they had on display were quite thin and seemed wall-mountable, even though they couldn't tell us exactly how thin they were.

I guess we'll just have to keep waiting.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Here's another article, with more pics.

Today @ PC World Mitsubishi Laser TV: Colors May Be Too Brilliant
LAS VEGAS -- Finally, after much hype, Mitsubishi unveiled their new Laser HDTV. The presentation took place the Moon nightclub at the Palms here in Las Vegas. Mitsubishi seemed very proud of their new technology, touting that it will revolutionize the way we look and think about High Definition.



The presentation started with the CEO of Mitsubishi talking about the R&D that was behind Laser TV. He said that Laser TV is great because lasers are the purest light form that we can see. Because of this, they say, Laser TV can produce colors so incredibly vivid it's above and beyond all current HDTV standards.

The colors that I saw from these TVs were indeed impressive. It's not that the Laser TV produced new colors, but rather enhanced the current colors. Amazing looking blues, extravagant reds, brilliant yellows, and harmonic purples overwhelmed my sense. I stared, mesmerized at these TVs and the colors that it produced.

I felt like a kid experiencing something new for the first time. I think I took my eyes off the TVs just once to turn to my colleague Jeff Kuta to say "wow." He looked back at me and simply nodded his head in agreement.

After my childish excitement died down, I began to dissect my experience rationally. As vivid as the colors were, I felt like it was almost too much. A sensory overload if you will. The colors were so bright and clear that it almost seemed artificial. In the way that the flavor of a watermelon Jolly Rancher is to a real watermelon. That is, the candy's artificial flavor is so intense, you know no watermelon would ever taste that way in real life.

It was as if the range of colors being produced by this television were somehow enhanced to heighten my senses, just like the artificial flavor of water melon.



I was glad to have a chance to feast my eyes on the Laser TV and its amazing display of colors. I am however skeptical on many things; most notable is that it will be interesting to see how well the TV displays standard definition.

Moreover, I'm curious to see how the public will react to seeing such intense colors. Perhaps people will agree with me that the colors are too vivid and thus overwhelming. Or maybe the majority of consumers will enjoy the artificial taste of the colors that are produced. After all, how many million Jolly Ranchers are sold a year?

The TVs used at the demo were prototypes, but you'll be able to get your hands on the real thing in Fall of 2008. Though pricing isn't announced, I was told that you won't see the Laser TVs at your Best Buys and Circuit Citys. Rather, they'll only be available through high-end retailers.

So yeah, it definitely sounds like they're gonna be expensive.
 

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thx glenn

So yeah, it definitely sounds like they're gonna be expensive.
:agreed:
I was told that you won't see the Laser TVs at your Best Buys and Circuit Citys. Rather, they'll only be available through high-end retailers.
that means like 4K+

Disappointing, I thought they would be reasonable.
 
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