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Hi,

is there a good supplement for women to take for weight loss (anything to help speed up the calorie burn process)?

Lifting weights and cardio is helping the wifey a lot (she only has 10 more lbs to lose but these are the hardest). I have her on squats and lifting as heavy as she can w/ all weight exercises. She gets frustrated because I use creatine etc...and she doesn't take any supplements besides protein powder.

Just wondering.

Thanks in advance.
 

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Supplements aren't really necessary. Also, lifting "too" heavy isn't all that necessary either. If she gets frustrated lifting heavy weights try switching it up to lower weights and aim for 3 sets of 15-20. The trick is to really just make sure you challenge yourself, how you go about that is up to you, whether it is pushing more weight or more reps. I find it keeps things interesting to mix it up.

In my experience in trying different thermogenics (note I haven't actually used a lot, only done trials), I haven't enjoyed them. If your heart is dead set on them, you can't go wrong with what GTmitsu has suggested, I also think those are more affordable than some others. Instead, I would suggest looking closely at potential diet changes. Here is a good nutrition plan from Dr. Jim Stoppani.

Bodybuilding.com - Jim Stoppani?s Six-Week Shortcut To Shred: Nutrition Overview

He does a great job of explaining things and even provides a video. Now I know not everything will apply to what you're looking for, BUT there is a lot that can be taken away here. You can take bits and pieces and apply them to your own needs, see how they work for you, adjust and repeat until you get what you're looking for. He also provides a break-down of supplements he recommends, which can be found here:

Bodybuilding.com - Jim Stoppani's Shortcut To Shred: Supplement Overview

The program is specifically geared toward shedding bodyfat so it does apply toward what you're looking for. Rather than suggesting an all-in-one fatburner, he provides some specific things to supplement that are meant to target fat loss.
These include:

- Yohimbe
- CLA
- Green Tea Extract
- Fish Oil
- Caffeine

Others in his recommendations help to shed bodyfat as well, but you can also read and choose for yourself. CLA and Fishoil are great to suppement regardless. Again, supplementation isn't as essential as a good solid diet, so I'd still recommend you visit the first link before diving into supplements. Eating right and drinking LOTS of water can go a long way. Good Luck :yesway:
 

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My girlfriend had good results with Hydroxycut and OxyElite Pro. As long as u take it the right way, both are amazing thermogenic supplements.
OxyElite is no longer offered. There were a few people having heart attacks while taking that. I agree that fat burners aren't really a requirement and but if you must take one I recommend Alphamine. Its a strong burner and gives you great energy and has a lot of the same properties of a OxyElite.
 

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I can't believe companies are still making billions on "supplements." Even FDA approved drugs administered under doctor supervision tend to kill people on occasion. Hydroxycut killed a few people and ruined a lot of livers and yet after it was pulled and brought back people are out there buying it back up.

Losing weight and/or getting in shape is as simple as breathing. Cut out pizza and McDonalds, limit portion size, hit the gym and live more actively. Walk to the corner store, use the stairs, throw a ball with the dog, etc. It really is that cheap and easy.
 

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OxyElite is no longer offered. There were a few people having heart attacks while taking that. I agree that fat burners aren't really a requirement and but if you must take one I recommend Alphamine. Its a strong burner and gives you great energy and has a lot of the same properties of a OxyElite.
They redid the recipe. It no longer contains Dimethylethylamine which was reported to cause issues. No tests performed on the supplement ever confirmed it had an adverse effect on people who took it responsibly. With that said, the new recipe isn't as strong, but still has positive results. As least when she took it. Cycled off it after 6 weeks as was suggested.

I can't believe companies are still making billions on "supplements." Even FDA approved drugs administered under doctor supervision tend to kill people on occasion. Hydroxycut killed a few people and ruined a lot of livers and yet after it was pulled and brought back people are out there buying it back up.

Losing weight and/or getting in shape is as simple as breathing. Cut out pizza and McDonalds, limit portion size, hit the gym and live more actively. Walk to the corner store, use the stairs, throw a ball with the dog, etc. It really is that cheap and easy.
With all due respect, it's not that easy for A LOT of people. People who take supplements do so to help certain ailments that would otherwise make getting certain results "easy". Sure, a lot of it can be a mental adjustment such as "I'm taking supplement xyz, Might as well excercise" but a lot of people do so to help with appetite suppressant, etc.

Supplements are constantly tested and improved, as well as removed from the market. The FDA does a damn good job limiting products that are linked to health issues.
 

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Oh trust me, it isn't even near that easy for me ;). The mental aspect, the drive, and control over food cravings, is the hardest part for me. But the proper diet can and will give you the right energy and nutrients to lose weight/get in shape, more often than not with minimal exercise (as long as the person lives actively; sitting at a desk would necessitate more gym time for example). It just seems the culture now is much more "I need to lose weight, so let me take something for it" or "I want to build muscle so let me take something for it" when supplements are NOT regulated by the FDA since they are not "drugs." Anyone can throw any concoction together they wish, make any claims they wish, and make millions betting on this culture's health.

OP, if your girl stops taking protein powder and starts eating an extra chicken breast, the last 10lb will fall off in a week or two. Protein powders, or ANY protein "supplement" is made up of calories, many of them with extra "filler" calories as well. Worse than that, the refined protein is filtered out through the kidneys. Without TONS of water, this weakens and at times clogs them, at best giving kidney stones and at worse causing kidney failure. It HAS HAPPENED. Of course these were extreme cases, but why would someone want to take something capable of this?

I love hearing the myths. "I need to take protein right after I work out so my muscles get the protein they need after my workout" or "I take protein right before my workout so that it hits my system right after my workout." It's all BS. The damaged muscles are being repaired for 36 hours after a workout, so there are 4-6 MEALS that need to contain moderate amounts of protein to properly build the muscle. Really, all protein powders are doing is making other people sick with your nasty farts.
 

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They redid the recipe. It no longer contains Dimethylethylamine which was reported to cause issues. No tests performed on the supplement ever confirmed it had an adverse effect on people who took it responsibly. With that said, the new recipe isn't as strong, but still has positive results. As least when she took it. Cycled off it after 6 weeks as was suggested.



With all due respect, it's not that easy for A LOT of people. People who take supplements do so to help certain ailments that would otherwise make getting certain results "easy". Sure, a lot of it can be a mental adjustment such as "I'm taking supplement xyz, Might as well excercise" but a lot of people do so to help with appetite suppressant, etc.

Supplements are constantly tested and improved, as well as removed from the market. The FDA does a damn good job limiting products that are linked to health issues.

 

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Oh trust me, it isn't even near that easy for me ;). The mental aspect, the drive, and control over food cravings, is the hardest part for me. But the proper diet can and will give you the right energy and nutrients to lose weight/get in shape, more often than not with minimal exercise (as long as the person lives actively; sitting at a desk would necessitate more gym time for example). It just seems the culture now is much more "I need to lose weight, so let me take something for it" or "I want to build muscle so let me take something for it" when supplements are NOT regulated by the FDA since they are not "drugs." Anyone can throw any concoction together they wish, make any claims they wish, and make millions betting on this culture's health.
True, but if certain supps have been reported to cause issues, the FDA investigates. Look at cases like Craze and the original Oxy Elite Pro. The fact is, not everyone has the time for a proper diet and they supplement to assist in either recovery of muscle or loss of fat. I don't have time to eat a chicken breast right after I lift so I sip amino's during and slam a protein shake after. Same reason I've used thermogenics while cutting, so I have a little extra energy to burn some fat.

OP, if your girl stops taking protein powder and starts eating an extra chicken breast, the last 10lb will fall off in a week or two. Protein powders, or ANY protein "supplement" is made up of calories, many of them with extra "filler" calories as well. Worse than that, the refined protein is filtered out through the kidneys. Without TONS of water, this weakens and at times clogs them, at best giving kidney stones and at worse causing kidney failure. It HAS HAPPENED. Of course these were extreme cases, but why would someone want to take something capable of this?
I just looked at my jug of protein (muscletech Walmart knock-off Six Star). One scoop contains 170 calories, 25g of protein, and 1.5g fat. An average chicken breast contains 250 calories, 30g protein, and between 8-15g fat. This also doesn't take into account any seasonings used (sodium) which we all know is bad for cutting/losing fat. Also, protein DOES NOT harm the kidneys what-so-ever. It has happened, yes, but under extreme circumstances like you said. But lets be realistic, driving your car increases your risk of a car crash. Drinking water increases your risk of intestinal parasites. We still do this. My point is, just because something can cause a problem, doesn't mean it should be avoided.

I love hearing the myths. "I need to take protein right after I work out so my muscles get the protein they need after my workout" or "I take protein right before my workout so that it hits my system right after my workout." It's all BS. The damaged muscles are being repaired for 36 hours after a workout, so there are 4-6 MEALS that need to contain moderate amounts of protein to properly build the muscle. Really, all protein powders are doing is making other people sick with your nasty farts.
I love hearing the myths from people warning others based off their a)uneducated opinions, and b) their personal experiences. What works for Jimbo isn't going to work for Shanaynay. OP asked a question, he was given responses. Telling him he doesn't need certain supps isn't what he asked for. Your last sentence shows a bit of ignorance I was not expecting from you Joseph. Protein powders have proven to be an effective supplement and natural protein replacement. Go ahead and tell Arnold or Ronny that the protein they've consumed over their BB careers have done nothing but give them nasty farts.
 

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Oh trust me, it isn't even near that easy for me ;). The mental aspect, the drive, and control over food cravings, is the hardest part for me. But the proper diet can and will give you the right energy and nutrients to lose weight/get in shape, more often than not with minimal exercise (as long as the person lives actively; sitting at a desk would necessitate more gym time for example). It just seems the culture now is much more "I need to lose weight, so let me take something for it" or "I want to build muscle so let me take something for it" when supplements are NOT regulated by the FDA since they are not "drugs." Anyone can throw any concoction together they wish, make any claims they wish, and make millions betting on this culture's health.

OP, if your girl stops taking protein powder and starts eating an extra chicken breast, the last 10lb will fall off in a week or two. Protein powders, or ANY protein "supplement" is made up of calories, many of them with extra "filler" calories as well. Worse than that, the refined protein is filtered out through the kidneys. Without TONS of water, this weakens and at times clogs them, at best giving kidney stones and at worse causing kidney failure. It HAS HAPPENED. Of course these were extreme cases, but why would someone want to take something capable of this?

I love hearing the myths. "I need to take protein right after I work out so my muscles get the protein they need after my workout" or "I take protein right before my workout so that it hits my system right after my workout." It's all BS. The damaged muscles are being repaired for 36 hours after a workout, so there are 4-6 MEALS that need to contain moderate amounts of protein to properly build the muscle. Really, all protein powders are doing is making other people sick with your nasty farts.
I have to disagree with a decent portion of what you're saying. Most protein powders do NOT contain an overly large amount of calories. Quality products tend to have ~130 calories for 20-25 grams of protein. A good rule of thumb is to look for about 10 grams of protein per 100 calories, for a good high protein snack/source/food/etc.

There also have been numerous studies about pre and post workout nutrition, and it has been shown to be beneficial. However, I will say that it is one of the more fine details that become more critical for further progressed lifters. I always recommend a good protein source and carb source such as an apple within an hour before lifting. Post workout, whey is a good thing, but I think fast digesting carbs (think sugar) are equally if not more important. All of these pre and post nutrition steps would become null though, if you fail to pay attention to the following meals, as you said.

I'm not pro-supplements either. I mix my own pre-workout drink, tailored to my needs, only with the exact ingredients I want. Other than that, I take a whey powder, fish oil, CLA and a multi. What's most important is that I stay on track with my diet, and drink lots of water.

One last thing I'd like to touch on because it kinda irked me, sodium really isn't bad for you when you're trying to cut fat. It may possibly make you hold water and cause you to "bloat", but that's about it. Sodium is really essential to muscle function, and as long as you're not taking it to extreme highs or lows, I wouldn't worry a bit. If you wanted to eat chicken instead of a whey shake, by all means go for it. Except now when you think about it like that (replacing shakes with whole foods such as chicken), you realize that to reach the same macros, you're going to be cramming your face, and that sounds exhausting in itself.
 

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Protein is 4-4.5 calories per gram (depending on who you ask). So if a supplement has 10cal/gram you've got to wonder what filler is in it and what it's made of. That's in a powder of course, because if it's in some type of bar you can count on carbs/fat (which isn't a bad thing).

As a pre-workout, it IS important to take in some carbs. Otherwise the liver releases glycogen in unmetered amounts when exertion is achieved. This is good for long-term workouts (really long running or swimming) but bad for the come-down after, when the pancreas has to produce extra insulin to process it all. On top of that, what the body no longer needs in processed carbs (sugar) goes straight to fat storage. This is why those 15 minute workouts are bullshit and people gain weight from them. The 15 minutes is just enough to release a shit ton of sugar only for it to be processed, leaving a sugar crash and resulting in cravings.

Carbs are fully processed within two hours, with the peak insulin levels ranging from 30 min to an hour after ingestion. For protein this is closer to six hours and fat shortly thereafter. Therefore it is of NO benefit to consume protein in any form for any particular time before/after a workout. What's important is that the body gets moderate amounts throughout the day. Any studies cited claiming otherwise should be taken with a grain of salt since they're most likely sponsored all or in-part by the multi-billion dollar supplement industry.

Getting enough protein is actually VERY easy on any schedule, unless you are on a Navy ship at sea where the only thing not carefully rationed is carbs. Eggs are very quick and easy, especially in liquid, whites-only form. It literally takes minutes to get plenty of protein which is already in the form in which the body most easily processes-animal. A chicken breast can be had in 20 minutes. I find it easy to freeze individual breasts right after buying. These can be pre-seasoned in a marinade for flavor (low-fat options available), thawed throughout the day in the fridge, and thrown in the oven at night. Fish is even quicker and great for you.

Yes, salt is incredibly important to health. The more you sweat, the more you can have. Limiting it will help keep water weight off, but you've got to have salt. In boot camp we had no salt whatsoever, and by the end I was craving it. My dad came to visit in his van and offered me some saltines. I literally licked the salt off and threw the crackers out the window.

Supplements can be and are beneficial to a lot of people trying to bulk up past their natural body type's limits. Their careful use has helped some people, but in at least 90% of cases not only are they not needed, but they can actually work against you.
 

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Protein is 4-4.5 calories per gram (depending on who you ask). So if a supplement has 10cal/gram you've got to wonder what filler is in it and what it's made of. That's in a powder of course, because if it's in some type of bar you can count on carbs/fat (which isn't a bad thing).
The following is from NutriStrategy, a reliable source for nutritional information.

Fat: 1 gram = 9 calories
Protein: 1 gram = 4 calories
Carbohydrates: 1 gram = 4 calories

According to my Protein jug, which I stated the information a few posts ago, My protein has ~7g filler.

Six Star Fat: 1.5g x 9 = 13.5 calories
Six Star Protein: 30g x 4 = 120 calories
Six Star Carbs: 8g x 4 = 32 calories

The ~7g of "filler" can be downsized as various forms of Calcium, Cholesterol, and Sodium. We can argue the dangers of an increased cholesterol diet which often correlates to a bodybuilders diet, and the science behind the highly refined cholestoral free Hydro-Whey products, but your arguments of fillers and mystery protein products is purely bro-science.

As a pre-workout, it IS important to take in some carbs. Otherwise the liver releases glycogen in unmetered amounts when exertion is achieved. This is good for long-term workouts (really long running or swimming) but bad for the come-down after, when the pancreas has to produce extra insulin to process it all. On top of that, what the body no longer needs in processed carbs (sugar) goes straight to fat storage. This is why those 15 minute workouts are bullshit and people gain weight from them. The 15 minutes is just enough to release a shit ton of sugar only for it to be processed, leaving a sugar crash and resulting in cravings.
I wont argue the necessity of carbs before a workout. However, this is a great way to cut the last few pounds. Working out on an empty stomach will result in decreased intensity but can lead to an increase in fat burn as long as every other aspect of the diet is spot on. Look into intermittent fasting. IF is by no means a permanent solution to cutting, but has helped many people push past their plateu and lose that last bit of fat. Worked for me, but I am an elite athlete:ninja2:.

Carbs are fully processed within two hours, with the peak insulin levels ranging from 30 min to an hour after ingestion. For protein this is closer to six hours and fat shortly thereafter. Therefore it is of NO benefit to consume protein in any form for any particular time before/after a workout. What's important is that the body gets moderate amounts throughout the day. Any studies cited claiming otherwise should be taken with a grain of salt since they're most likely sponsored all or in-part by the multi-billion dollar supplement industry.
Carbohydrate | Human Sciences

Where is your labcoat bro? Eating protein in addition to carbohydrates within 30 minutes of exercise will provide amino acids for building, maintenance, and repair of muscle. Research shows just 7-10 g of protein along with the carbohydrate is enough to start muscle synthesis and repair. Consuming carbohydrates within the first 30 minutes after exercise optimizes replenishment of glycogen stores. Whether or not you believe in the "anabolic window" scheme is not my concern, but your attempt at broscience here is flattering.

Getting enough protein is actually VERY easy on any schedule, unless you are on a Navy ship at sea where the only thing not carefully rationed is carbs. Eggs are very quick and easy, especially in liquid, whites-only form. It literally takes minutes to get plenty of protein which is already in the form in which the body most easily processes-animal. A chicken breast can be had in 20 minutes. I find it easy to freeze individual breasts right after buying. These can be pre-seasoned in a marinade for flavor (low-fat options available), thawed throughout the day in the fridge, and thrown in the oven at night. Fish is even quicker and great for you.
Over the summer I worked 70hrs a week. If it wasn't for protein supplementation, I would not have been able to keep my hard earned size. Egg Whites are one of the slowest forms of digesting protein. An egg-white breakfast wont be fully digested until dinner time, so a fast digesting Whey is an adequate supplement. Why spend 20 minutes cooking a breast, another 10 minutes to eat it, and then the 5-10 minute clean up, when I can just fill my shaker, add a scoop of chocolate peanut-butter powder, and be on my way. In less than a minute I get a full serving of protein and I don't have to bullshit around the kitchen waiting for it. Plus, what if you undercook that breast?


Supplements can be and are beneficial to a lot of people trying to bulk up past their natural body type's limits. Their careful use has helped some people, but in at least 90% of cases not only are they not needed, but they can actually work against you.
Show me your reference on that number. That seems WAY high.
 

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Protein Powder: What You Should Know

Athletes and Protein: The Truth About Supplements | ACTIVE

Do You Need Protein Supplements? How Much Protein Do You Need? - Fitness Blender

Protein Supplement Myth Revealed by Body of Work | LiveScience

Do you absolutely have to use protein powder to gain muscle? - Bodybuilding.com Forums

You can poke holes in these sources all you want, but you can see the body of research is varying in context from medicinal to fitness.

Do "supplements" contain protein, even beneficial protein? I would say yes, absolutely, but what else is in there? You list carbs, fat and protein. What chemicals are in there? What do these chemicals do, long-term? People once consumed goods out of cans sealed with lead and had no "ill effects"...in the short-term. They also lined the walls of their homes with asbestos, the miracle material of the time. How do you know what a "supplement" is going to do by the time you're 40?

Now let's discuss "pre-workout." I doubt you'll find one without anhydrous caffeine, with lots of them being 400mg or more (there are about 65mg in a cup of coffee). Large amounts of caffeine has been known to increase blood pressure, anxiety, pulse, and sleeplessness. I'm not pro- or against, but it's one more of those things you just don't need and is in fact pretty damn bad for you--kind of the opposite of what you're going to the gym for, right?

As for my labcoat? If you've got a buddy with the diabetes you can borrow a fresh sharp and check your BGL 30 minutes and an hour after eating. This is where it peaks and in the following few hours it tapers off to fasting level. Do the same right after a workout and then an hour after. You'll see it peak to higher than fasting levels even if working out on an empty stomach, and then an hour later it'll be 10-20 points lower than your baseline (that's the resulting crash).

The point I'm making is that almost no one actually needs ANYTHING other than a good balance of diet and exercise to meet whatever goal they have. This has been shown, over and over, to have the best and longest lasting results. Sure, anyone can do their supplements and crazy caffeine-fueled workouts and get wherever they want to go quick, but without the diet and routine to back it up whatever results come of it will be short-lived.

Fasting has been done for centuries in varying forms and I wouldn't argue against it. I tried it years ago for differing reasons and liked it.
 

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Protein is 4-4.5 calories per gram (depending on who you ask). So if a supplement has 10cal/gram you've got to wonder what filler is in it and what it's made of. That's in a powder of course, because if it's in some type of bar you can count on carbs/fat (which isn't a bad thing).
As GTmitsu pointed out, you're a bit loopy when it comes to protein powders. We are not talking about gainers, period. You do the math. I said a good quality protein powder has 20-25 grams and ~130 calories per serving. Lets pick the low end, 20 grams per 130 calories. OK, that means 80 calories are from protein, thats it. That leaves you with 50 calories left over for these so called "fillers" you keep insisting are so prevalent in protein powders. That really isn't much at all when you consider there is usually ~1-1.5 g of fat equating to 9-14 calories.

Revisit my post, I was talking primarily about food sources as a rule of thumb for picking healthy snacks. Perhaps I should've been more specific about that rule/tip when I first said that, so I'm at fault there. It is just a helpful thing to keep in mind and simplify choosing snacks, especially for those who might be on the go a lot and not have time to plan. It wasn't a comment related to supplements in particular, but it does support that various forms of protein powders provide a decent solution for snacks on the go. As for myself, I stick to whole foods as much as possible.
 

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Protein Powder: What You Should Know

Athletes and Protein: The Truth About Supplements | ACTIVE

Do You Need Protein Supplements? How Much Protein Do You Need? - Fitness Blender

Protein Supplement Myth Revealed by Body of Work | LiveScience

Do you absolutely have to use protein powder to gain muscle? - Bodybuilding.com Forums

You can poke holes in these sources all you want, but you can see the body of research is varying in context from medicinal to fitness.

Do "supplements" contain protein, even beneficial protein? I would say yes, absolutely, but what else is in there? You list carbs, fat and protein. What chemicals are in there? What do these chemicals do, long-term? People once consumed goods out of cans sealed with lead and had no "ill effects"...in the short-term. They also lined the walls of their homes with asbestos, the miracle material of the time. How do you know what a "supplement" is going to do by the time you're 40?

Now let's discuss "pre-workout." I doubt you'll find one without anhydrous caffeine, with lots of them being 400mg or more (there are about 65mg in a cup of coffee). Large amounts of caffeine has been known to increase blood pressure, anxiety, pulse, and sleeplessness. I'm not pro- or against, but it's one more of those things you just don't need and is in fact pretty damn bad for you--kind of the opposite of what you're going to the gym for, right?

As for my labcoat? If you've got a buddy with the diabetes you can borrow a fresh sharp and check your BGL 30 minutes and an hour after eating. This is where it peaks and in the following few hours it tapers off to fasting level. Do the same right after a workout and then an hour after. You'll see it peak to higher than fasting levels even if working out on an empty stomach, and then an hour later it'll be 10-20 points lower than your baseline (that's the resulting crash).

The point I'm making is that almost no one actually needs ANYTHING other than a good balance of diet and exercise to meet whatever goal they have. This has been shown, over and over, to have the best and longest lasting results. Sure, anyone can do their supplements and crazy caffeine-fueled workouts and get wherever they want to go quick, but without the diet and routine to back it up whatever results come of it will be short-lived.

Fasting has been done for centuries in varying forms and I wouldn't argue against it. I tried it years ago for differing reasons and liked it.

I don't think anyone here was arguing that supplements are needed. GTmitsu even stated that he used them when he was incredibly busy.

I could just easily find sources that go against everything you're saying, not that I disagree with you, I'm just saying. Here is an interesting read that I found with minimal effort.

Bodybuilding.com - A Defence Against The Backlash On Protein Powders!
 

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UMADBREH?
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Hi,

is there a good supplement for women to take for weight loss (anything to help speed up the calorie burn process)?

Lifting weights and cardio is helping the wifey a lot (she only has 10 more lbs to lose but these are the hardest). I have her on squats and lifting as heavy as she can w/ all weight exercises. She gets frustrated because I use creatine etc...and she doesn't take any supplements besides protein powder.

Just wondering.

Thanks in advance.
The point I'm making is that almost no one actually needs ANYTHING other than a good balance of diet and exercise to meet whatever goal they have. This has been shown, over and over, to have the best and longest lasting results. Sure, anyone can do their supplements and crazy caffeine-fueled workouts and get wherever they want to go quick, but without the diet and routine to back it up whatever results come of it will be short-lived.
My point is that you keep insisting that all supplements are evil and that OP should not resort to them. Your posts have been nothing but mis-information and biased opinions that you seem so insistent on being factual scientific data, and it's frustrating me. OP clearly stated the current activity level and nutrition isn't working for his GF and he's seeking something to supplement what shes doing now, and you've provided him with nothing but slanderous yada-yada.

If you're bored, look into Jim Stoppani's work. He knows his shit, has a phd to back it, and dude is jacked as all hell.
 

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Valid points, and I know I'm not going to sway anyone either way. I think my being exposed to a culture of a combination of newer generation (lazy and instant-gratification-oriented) and self-improvement buffs (some navy some marine) as well as working in a hospital for over a year (though admittedly not in the caregiving field) has led to my perception of a LOT of wasted money and hive-mind misconceptions on what's "healthy." People have actually had to go on dialysis from over-consumption of these "supplements." And really, it doesn't affect me one bit what others want to do. I do hate smelling the protein farts though :lmfao:
 

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If you're bored, look into Jim Stoppani's work. He knows his shit, has a phd to back it, and dude is jacked as all hell.
:yesway::agreed:

I couldn't agree more. I really enjoy his work and programs and recommend them to anyone who hasn't seen them. Exactly why I suggested my first two links. :yesway:

TurtleTamer, I think I get where you're coming from now a little more. The current generation very much has the attitude of "I want it, and I want it RIGHT NOW". Meaning, they're lazy and impatient. Rather than put in the work, a lot of people think there must be some sort of magic solution or fast lane to becoming fit. I can't count how many times I've heard guys discussing how many supplements they try, and talking about how they "need" to try something new (supplement wise) to break through the wall they crashed into. As a result, I personally believe that people end up over-using and abusing supplements. Now with THAT, I can see potential risks. This may also be associated to deficient diets that people like this tend to have, because they failed to take the time to really pay attention to the most important factor that is balanced nutrition. Let's be honest, figuring out a proper diet that really really works for you, is a lot of work. Slamming incredible amounts of supplements, not so much.

I can think of one guy right off the top of my head that is a perfect example of this. He has always asked myself as well as others, "what do you take to....?", you get the idea. At one point he was saying he was stacking multiple pre-workout supplements on top of one another all at once (which can be done, if chosen properly), but pretty much all of which were loaded with stimulants.:sweat:

Either way, I think there really is no one right answer. Ideally, a balanced diet is best, your body thrives on whole foods. However, proper supplementation can be beneficial. The key is to make sure you understand what it is you're taking, and do so within reason. Also, make sure you're putting in the hard work first both in the gym, and with your nutrition.
 

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Superbowl Bound 2015
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Also if you aren't interested in a supplement. I would suggest looking into rebootwithjoe.com It a juice cleanse and although it can get expensive might help her drop the last few pounds. I do juicing but I also still eat solid food.
 
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