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Hello :)
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Since the winter kicked in out of nowhere this week I gotta a question to ask you guys. I drive 00 GS with full suspension done (Koni's,Tokico, Pro-Kit, Sway bat etc:) and the Q is .What should be the proper PSI in Front & Rear tires during cold weather ? Is it better to keep it higher or lower ? Does the high/lowe PSI effect traction in snow condition? I know this may be a stupid question but I was just wondering if there arer any effects from changing PSI:wavey:

Thanks,
Clipse3GS
 

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idk how it is by you but I learned when driving on salty roads I like to stay at alower psi so I have more traction. Higher psi will cause the car to kick out too much and just slide. dont be scared whne in the morning the tires look flatter, the cold causes the air to almost shrink, once it gets warmer they will rise. Im usually a 30-33 psi fan
 

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30-33 is actually considered "high" for some people ;)

I can't say with any real authority on it but during the winter in MN I've always run about 5 psi above what is printed on the sticker in the door jamb. You get "something like" a 1 psi drop for every 10 deg. F temperature change. And so with temps averaging something like 50 degrees below normal I add an additional 5psi (this of course has to be measured in a warm garage or anywhere else close to "normal" temps).

You can actually overinflate a bit and "cut" through the snow, differently than how you'd want to lower psi to say drive a truck on sand. Each has their pro's and cons, and to be really accurate you even have to talk about what kind of snow you have... light powdery stuff, slush, ice, etc. would each have different ways of dealing with them.

I do the 5 psi thing and have never had an issue.

(Well aside from skidding on huge patches of ice and going into the ditch, which no psi would save you from if you're just dumb and not paying attention. But that's a different story.)
 

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Ph.D > me
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I can't tell you what tire pressure you should run but I will say that you want it to be higher than you keep it during the spring/summer/fall seasons. Reason: higher tire pressure = smaller contact patch = narrower snow ski = faster braking.
 

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Christopher Pearce
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There are a lot of factors that can go into what tire pressure you should run, especially in the winter (e.g., low-profile tires, etc.). I would run them a bit higher than you would have them during the summer months as a rule of thumb for any tire. My dad has always told me that for every 5 or 10 degrees that the temperature drops, you can expect to lose around 1 PSI of pressure in your tires.
 

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dont be scared whne in the morning the tires look flatter, the cold causes the air to almost shrink, once it gets warmer they will rise. Im usually a 30-33 psi fan
:hahano: Cold weather does not cause the air to shrink, it causes the air molecules to slow down thus taking up less area. Once your tires warm up, the molecules will be excited from the heat and will expand slightly.

I always drive at rated pressure or a little above. Like Phil and other have said, less contact patch in the snow is better so you can "cut" thru it.
 

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Hello :)
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Yea but you don't drive your 3g in the winter and I was thinking if I run lower PSI on my tires (205/55/16) I could get a better traction in snow/wet conditions
 

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I can't tell you what tire pressure you should run but I will say that you want it to be higher than you keep it during the spring/summer/fall seasons. Reason: higher tire pressure = smaller contact patch = narrower snow ski = faster braking.
Yea but you don't drive your 3g in the winter and I was thinking if I run lower PSI on my tires (205/55/16) I could get a better traction in snow/wet conditions
Read the above statement. Also it doesnt matter if you drive a 3G or a Fiesta, the principle is the same when it comes to driving in the snow.
 

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taking up less area
= Shrinking :fawk:

if I run lower PSI on my tires (205/55/16) I could get a better traction in snow/wet conditions
Not necessarily. You do that in sand to float better on top and not sink. A snowmobile track works the same way. But in snow / water *with a car* you don't want to float on top, you want to cut through to what's underneath.
 

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= Shrinking :fawk:
Not necessarily. You do that in sand to float better on top and not sink. A snowmobile track works the same way. But in snow / water *with a car* you don't want to float on top, you want to cut through to what's underneath.
My guess is he is trying to think of it like a snow shoe, but you are correct, you want to cut thru the snow to the pavment underneath.

Shrinking :fawkme:
 
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