Mitsubishi Eclipse 3G Club banner
741 - 748 of 748 Posts

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
54,504 Posts
Discussion Starter · #741 ·
Drove to and from Iowa this weekend to shine up a plane, had a slight problem on my way there but everything turned out ok.


Sent from my SM-G892U using Tapatalk
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
54,504 Posts
Discussion Starter · #742 ·
Been a minute, decided to change the 22yr old original Toyota radiator out for a new Denso radiator which looks to be the same as stock. I got new stock hoses and clamps as well as new Toyota Super Long Life Coolant (SLCC) which is bright pink instead of red, so all the red coolant from 10yrs ago needs to exit the engine since it looks more like the blood at the bottom of your pound of ground beef than it does Toyota red coolant. I drained exactly 1 gallon from the radiator and drained some amount from the block drain on the back of the engine while slicing open the back of my hand on some sharp heat shield sheet metal too. Radiator is just about out, no impossibly seized bolts, and if you zoom in on the passenger side you can see my lovely hand crafted aluminum trans cooler lines to the aux cooler hidden under the very ugly cruise control actuator box.

Motor vehicle Hood Automotive exterior Automotive design Gas


I just need to figure out how to safely remove the coolant from the heater core, might try to suck it out with my wet/dry vac.
 

·
Registered
2005 Spyder GT
Joined
·
542 Posts
Been a minute, decided to change the 22yr old original Toyota radiator out for a new Denso radiator which looks to be the same as stock. I got new stock hoses and clamps as well as new Toyota Super Long Life Coolant (SLCC) which is bright pink instead of red, so all the red coolant from 10yrs ago needs to exit the engine since it looks more like the blood at the bottom of your pound of ground beef than it does Toyota red coolant. I drained exactly 1 gallon from the radiator and drained some amount from the block drain on the back of the engine while slicing open the back of my hand on some sharp heat shield sheet metal too. Radiator is just about out, no impossibly seized bolts, and if you zoom in on the passenger side you can see my lovely hand crafted aluminum trans cooler lines to the aux cooler hidden under the very ugly cruise control actuator box.

View attachment 45099

I just need to figure out how to safely remove the coolant from the heater core, might try to suck it out with my wet/dry vac.
get a gallon of distilled water and about six feet of hose that fits tightly over the inlet and outlet for the heater core. Cut hose in half and attach to inlet and outlet. Then use wet vac or vacuum pump to flush heater core using, one side attached to vac/pump draining into pan, and other side of hose drawing water from the gallon. Suck through about half a gallon, then reverse the process (back flush). You will know by the looks of the drain water if you need to also use a flush cleaner.
If you have city water (low minerals) instead of well, then you can safely use tap water through a garden hose instead, at low pressure, letting it drain into a pan at first to collect the old coolant, than onto the ground once it starts coming out clear. Let it run for awhile, first in the usual direction, then reverse everything to back flush in the opposite direction. Then prime the heater core with coolant using the same hose and a funnel at the inlet side and temporarily plugging the outlet side. Re-attach the heater core hoses and move on to filling the radiator and burping the air.
Remember to raise the front of the car while flushing and replacing the coolant at the radiator, and refer to coolant capacity specs to get an idea of how much old coolant came out. About a month or so later, drain the radiator again and refill, which if done periodically, increases the time period recommended to do full flushes.
The heater core is more fragile than the radiator, so be cautious about the pressure you use, air or water. I don't recommend using a compressor, though.
Might as well put in a new thermostat and gasket, too, seeing how you are replacing the hoses anyway.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
54,504 Posts
Discussion Starter · #745 ·
Good advices, but I'm lazy, almost out of distilled water, and not looking forward to making several extra gallons of waste water since I have to take it to work for disposal.
I'm still working on getting the upper hose off at the engine end, it's really buried in there! I'll have to bring home some specialty pliers from my tool box at work to reach the clamp and then getting the new clamp set in there is going to be a real joy too. I can't put the lower hose on until I clean up the thermostat housing neck, it's got some corrosion on the aluminum and that won't make a good seal on the new hose.
I'll also finally be installing my new to me intake manifold before the front bumper goes on, it would be easier to pull the intake manifold and get to the upper hose but I like to complete one project before starting another one however I may have to side step my rule about stacking up projects for this one.
 

·
Registered
2005 Spyder GT
Joined
·
542 Posts
Good advices, but I'm lazy, almost out of distilled water, and not looking forward to making several extra gallons of waste water since I have to take it to work for disposal.
I'm still working on getting the upper hose off at the engine end, it's really buried in there! I'll have to bring home some specialty pliers from my tool box at work to reach the clamp and then getting the new clamp set in there is going to be a real joy too. I can't put the lower hose on until I clean up the thermostat housing neck, it's got some corrosion on the aluminum and that won't make a good seal on the new hose.
I'll also finally be installing my new to me intake manifold before the front bumper goes on, it would be easier to pull the intake manifold and get to the upper hose but I like to complete one project before starting another one however I may have to side step my rule about stacking up projects for this on e.
mine is a DD, so I always plan ahead and usually replace parts BEFORE they fail, for example I have 93k on the car and already bought everything I need to change the timing belt AND water pump, even though both are still working fine. As they say, somethings are best replaced together. When I went to replace my struts, I ended up replacing my entire front suspension AND axles. I'm on a mission to replace EVERY part on this car, with tons of spare parts waiting in the shed to install. LOL
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
54,504 Posts
Discussion Starter · #747 ·
The thermostat is a little over 10years old but it's not been a bunch of miles, I had replaced it with a dealer part a little after I got the car. It's behind the alternator partially and while I can sneak it out it's a pain to do and working fine, car hits normal temps in normal amount of time and isn't winter driven so hot heat isn't a priority. If I were to change it I might grab one slightly cooler but it's fine as it is. I had thought about replacing the radiator fan motors but dealer parts are about $300 a motor! Aftermarket fan assemblies are cheaper but the quality is a lot less too.

Sent from my SM-G892U using Tapatalk
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
54,504 Posts
Discussion Starter · #748 · (Edited)
Going out later today to get a hose pick set because it's the one tool I didn't think to bring home from work on the long holiday weekend, should be able to get the upper hose off, new hoses on, and cooling system filled then bled of air this weekend so I can move onto installing the intake manifold. Clearly I'm putting in the long hours on this one. Work for 5 minutes, get stuck, take 2 hour break.

Edit: It's tomorrow now, I got my hose picks yesterday when we went out for some other things and got the hoses changed today. 1 gallon of fresh coolant is in and I'll let it sit a few hours while we walk the dogs then add some more tonight and let it sit overnight and hopefully self-bleed most of the air out of the system for me because I left my hand-held scan tool at work and I really like to see actual coolant temp when I'm running an engine to purge air. Gauges are so inaccurate, especially computer driven ones like mine. It'll tell you it's cold, it's normal, or it's overheating but that's about it.
I will say I am surprised by how soft and loose the old hoses were compared to the new ones, I expected some difference but yikes big big difference there.
Edit2: Ran the engine tonight and got the thermostat opened up easily, pink coolant is pretty red but whatever it's mostly fresh stuff now so good enough. I'll run it a few more times before I drive it to ensure all the air is out so I don't get in trouble on a test drive. Without the scan tool I can't tell the exact thermostat opening temp but it might be a little below the rated temperature. Found a few places my trans cooler lines need extra protection from rubbing the body or other parts of the car so I'll slide some vinyl onto them in those areas when I get a chance.
 
741 - 748 of 748 Posts
Top