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so i searched around and dint find anything on this. i seam to be having water collecting inside my muffler tip. thought it might be a seal or some thing gone bad. actually saw liquid spit out of the muffler yesterday. wasnt sure if that was normal or not. thanks for input.
 

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If it's just a small amount of water spitting out of the exhaust, that's actually a sign that your engine is running very efficiently. When fuel is being thoroughly burned, one of the byproducts of its combustion is water. If it's a large amount of water that is flowing out, that may be a different story...
 

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Haven't seen it in our cars, but some rout condensation from the air conditioner out the tail pipe.
If nothing is wrong with the engine and no lack in performance, I wouldn't worry about it.
 

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BoomGoesTheDynaMitt
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Unless it is a steady stream I would not seat it. Mine has spit out water drops before.... I think it gets more pronounced in cold weather too.
 

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Mine has spit out water drops before.... I think it gets more pronounced in cold weather too.
It would...since the air is much more dense, you get a more efficient burn.

In theory, to an extent, the same would go for night driving as well...after the sun goes down plants naturally expell more oxygen, so it's been said that you get a more dense air charge, better fuel economy, etc...that's one of the main reasons you see so many OTR drivers making their long hauls at night...in theory.

If you want to know the difference between theory and reality, that's a discussion for OT...:bigthumb:
 

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its condensation from the exhaust piping being cold then heating up so the liquid is just siting in the pipes and muffler until u give it gas.
 

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its condensation from the exhaust piping being cold then heating up so the liquid is just siting in the pipes and muffler until u give it gas.
It's more than just condensation...it's actually a byproduct of combustion. Octane, the most abundant hydrocarbon found in gasoline, is C8H18. When mixed with 25O2, that is 25 molecules of oxygen, (C8H18 + 25O2), the byproduct is 8C02 + 9H2O, or 8 molecules of carbon dioxide and 9 molecules of water. There are of course many other ingredients in gasoline, which is why there are so many "harmful" byproducts, but water is a normal byproduct of the combustion process of gasoline...:ugh2:
 

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it is the byproduct of the catalytic converter
Close, but not quite. Catalytic converters are designed to reduce oxides of nitrogen (NO & NO2...or NOx), hydrocarbons (unburnt fuel), and carbon monoxide (CO). Usually, these converters have two catalysts in them...one is designed to reduce the NOx in the exhaust by separating the nitrogen from the oxygen...2NO will become N2 + O2, or 2NO2 will become N2 + 2O2 (either way, the NOx will become separate nitrogen and oxygen molecules, which are normally in the air). The other catalyst is designed to reduce hydrocarbons and carbon monoxide by burning, or oxidizing, it (hence, the heat generated by the converters)...the hydrocarbons would simply burn separating the carbon and hydrogen and making carbon dioxide and water (as I described earlier)...two carbon monoxide molecule (CO) would be mixed with one oxygen molecule (hence, the term oxidize) and become carbon dioxide...2CO + O2 = 2CO2.

So, the normal byproducts of the reaction with a vehicle's exhaust and a catalytic converter would be nitrogen, oxygen, and carbon dioxide. You're probably saying, "wait, you said hydrocarbons convert to carbon dioxide and water!" Correct...that's why I said, "close, but not quite." While there would be a very small amount of water produced in the converter, the amount of hydrocarbons being oxidized there compared to the amount being oxidized inside the engine is hardly enough to mention...it'd be like using a sprinkler system to water a lawn, and then throwing a cup of water on it for good measure...sure, that cup of water might affect a few blades of grass, but do you think you'll notice the difference? :ugh2:
 

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Eeeh.. plants expel Oxygen during the day, during the night they release Carbon Dioxide. :ugh2:
:uh:

You're right...I don't what the heck I was thinking with that one. So, it's not from plants, but I know I've read somewhere that the air charge is typically more dense at night, providing better fuel economy...maybe it's just due to lower temperatures...now I'm going to have to read up on this again after this session in school is finished...:scratch:
 

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BoomGoesTheDynaMitt
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somebody knows there chemistry lol
:agreed: A+ on the Chemistry
Eeeh.. plants expel Oxygen during the day, during the night they release Carbon Dioxide. :ugh2:
:agreed: D- on the Biology ;)
I've read somewhere that the air charge is typically more dense at night, providing better fuel economy...maybe it's just due to lower temperatures...
:agreed: 100%

Thanks for the detailed info Bean!
 

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:agreed: A+ on the Chemistry

:agreed: D- on the Biology ;)

:agreed: 100%

Thanks for the detailed info Bean!
No problem...that's what these forums are for...and besides, I couldn't sleep that night...:rofl:
 
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