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Ph.D > me
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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Lug Pattern

Wheels used on the third generation Eclipse and 8G Galant must have a 5x114.3 (5x4.5") bolt pattern. For wheels that have two bolt patterns (like 5x100/5x114.3 or 5x114.3/5x120), one of those bolt patterns must be 5x114.3 in order for that wheel to fit.

Wheel Width

The width of wheels for this application can range anywhere between 6" and 8.5". WIDTH ALONE MEANS NOTHING. It must be combined with offset to determine if and how a wheel will fit on the car. Where a 7.5" wide +48 offset wheel will fit just fine, an 8" wide +48 offset wheel will not due to the lack of inner clearance with the rear vertical control arms.

Lug Nut Size

12 x 1.5mm

Offset

Factory GT wheel spec: 17x6.5" ; +46 offset ; 5x114.3 ; 67.1mm centerbore (applies to all 2000+ Eclipse models and most Mitsubishi cars)

Offset is the measured distance in millimeters between the centerline of the wheel and the hub mounting surface (where the wheel hub mounts up against the brake rotor/drum hub).

The basic principal behind offset is that all things being equal, the higher the offset the wheel is, the more tucked the wheel will be. The lower the offset, the farther the wheel will protrude.

Example: a 17x7" wheel with a +40 offset will protrude out an extra 15mm when compared to a 17x7" +55 offset wheel. In retrospect, the +55 offset 17x7 will be pushed 15mm closer into the wheel well when compared to the +40 offset 17x7".

Given the many sizes of wheels that are designed for the 3G (and similar platforms) offset should be between +35 and +48.

While offset is SOLELY a measurement of wheel parameters, offset does play a role in determining if a certain size tire will fit -and- not rub any suspension/body components.

Width/Offset Recommendations

Here's a reference for offset ranges that can be used safely for different width wheels.

7.0": +32 to +48

7.5": +35 to +45

8.0": +38 to +43

8.5": +40 to +41

Hubcentric Rings

The principle of hubcentric rings is as follows:

You have 3 spinning circular objects (the axle hub, the brake rotor, and the wheel/tire combo). So just imagine a small circle (axle hub), a bigger circle (brake rotor), and the biggest circle (wheel/tire combo). The ideal situation is to have the center most SINGLE POINT of all three circles to be exactly the same. If one circle isn't spinning on the same axis as the other two, the total motion of all three circles combined won't make a circle, but instead will combine to make an oval. Imagine if your wheels and tires were shaped like ovals, you'd get vibrations at speed.

The hubcentric ring compensates for differences between the centerbore of the brake rotor and axle hub, and between the centerbore of the wheel and axle hub. It allows the brake rotor and/or the wheel/tire combo to be better positioned on the hub so that the center most point of all three parts are the same. In the case with my current SSR wheels, the centerbores are bigger than the centerbores of the axle hubs so the center most point of the wheels isn't the same as the center most point of the axle hubs.

Here's what a hub centric ring looks like:



Here's what a centerbore looks like without a hubcentric ring:



Here's what the centerbore looks like with a hubcentric ring:





So lets say that you order a set of wheels that have a 73.1mm centerbore, you'd have to order centering rings that have a 73.1mm outer diameter and a 67.1mm inner diameter. If the wheels have a 75mm centerbore, you'd need rings that have a 75mm outer diameter with a 67.1mm inner diameter.

Recommended Tire Sizes

15" - 195/65-15 (Stock RS size)
16" - 205/55-16 (Stock GS size) ; 225/50-16
17" - 215/50-17 (Stock GT size) ; 225/45-17 ; 235/45-17
18" - 215/45-18 ; 225/40-18 ; 235/40-18
19" - 225/35-19 ; 235/35-19

Lets look at the tires listed in the 18" size.

In the tire size 225/40-18, 225 is the section width of the tire in millimeters. 40 is the aspect ratio (percentage) of the sidewall compared to the section width of the tire.

Example: the sidewall of a 40 series tire is 40% of the section width of the tire, which is equal to 90 millimeters for a 225/40-18 tire. The sidewall of a 45 series, 215mm tire is 96.75 millimeters. The 40 series tire will have a smaller sidewall (lower profile) than the 45 series tire. The sidewall of a 75 series 265mm tire (truck tire) is 198.75mm. The last number in the tire size is the required rim diameter needed to mount a specific tire.

This link will give you a good idea about changing your tire size and the effects it'll have on your speedo/odometer:

Tire size calculator

The tire sizes listed above are the ones that will keep your speedometer/odometer pretty accurate. Any other tire that has a smaller overall diameter will make you think your going faster than you actually are. This will put MORE miles onto your car faster than if you had tires with a similar overall diameter compared to stock.

Here's a really great calculator that calculates BOTH changes in offset and tire size!

Tire/Wheel Combination Calculator

Wheel / tire size calculator / comparer - WHEELSMASTER

Here is the best tire/wheel calculator. Enjoy :)
If you decide to use ANY tire size that's not listed in the aforementioned size list, you WILL experience noticeable negative effects in the accuracy of your speedometer, odometer, ABS (Anti-lock Braking System), and (TCS) Traction Control System, which can and more than likely will decrease passenger safety... Take this statement close to heart.

Tire Fitment on Different Width Wheels
The following will give you a GENERAL idea of how different width tires will fit on different width wheels. These are purely generalizations and you should confirm tire to wheel fitment by looking up an individual tires rim width range in its specifications. What everyone needs to realize in this section is that as a tires sidewall gets smaller and smaller, it'll need wider and wider wheels to ensure proper & SAFE contact patches between the tire and the ground. For example, the rim width range for a 215/40-17 tire is 7.0" - 8.5" whearas the rim width range for a 215/50-17 is 6.0" - 7.5" because the 215/50-17 has a larger sidewall than the 215/40-17. Another example, a the minimum rim width for a 235/45-17 tire is 7.5", whereas the minimum rim width for a 235/40-18 tire is 8". The 235/40-18 needs a wider rim because of the decreased sidewall. The Acura MDX comes with 235/75-17"s and they're mounted on 6.5" wide wheels. That is possible and safe because the sidewall on that tire is HUGE! For this listing I will only compare the tire sizes that I recommend for the 3G.

15" Tires

195/65-15 ; Rim Width Range = 5.5" - 7.0"

16" Tires

205/55-16 ; Rim Width Range = 5.5" - 7.5"
225/50-16 ; Rim Width Range = 6.0" - 8.0"

17" Tires

215/50-17 ; Rim Width Range = 6.0" - 7.5"
225/45-17 ; Rim Width Range = 7.0" - 8.5"
235/45-17 ; Rim Width Range = 7.5" - 9.0"

18" Tires

215/45-18 ; Rim Width Range = 7.0" - 8.0"
225/40-18 ; Rim Width Range = 7.5" - 9.0"
235/40-18 ; Rim Width Range = 8.0" - 9.5" (I did run these on 18x7.5"s without problems)

19" Tires

225/35-19 ; Rim Width Range = 7.5" - 9.0"
235/35-19 ; Rim Width Range = 8.0" - 9.5"

Lowered Suspensions & Different Wheels
Now that you hopefully understand what offset is and the parameters surrounding tire sizes, it's time to combine the two.

A common question on this board is "Will I rub?" Offset plays very little a role in determining if your FRONT TIRES will rub on something inside the wheel well. Offset plays a large role in determing if your wheel/tire combo will rub the REAR vertical control arms. To reitterate, offset is very important in determining if a wheel/tire combo will rub in the rear, but not nearly as important in the front.

When lowered ANY AMOUNT, a 225mm width tire, on 7" - 7.5" wide rims with an offset between +38 and +43 or +42 and +48, respectively, will not be prone to rubbing ANYTHING inside the front or rear wheel wells. Don't EVER mount 235 width tires on ANY rim with an offset of +48 or higher.

When lowered more than 1.2" a 235mm width tire on any wheel will be very prone to rubbing this black box in your FRONT wheel wells:


Unlowered OR lowered, a 235mm width tire on a 7.5" wide wheel with an offset up to +45 will come VERY CLOSE to wedging up against the REAR vertical control arms. If you have 7.5" wide +42 ~ +45 offset 18" wheels, stick with either 225/40-18's or 215/45-18's.

Coming Soon: Inner Suspension Clearance Tolerances

 

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well Phil, might as well put in my 2c worth, in the form of a question.

more on road race track then street.
using 5zigin 17x8 with a 35 offset. also longer studs up front with concentric hub spacers to clear the brembo system. tires are 225/45.
my question is would 235's clear? the more rubber the better, if possible?
i may also go into race rubber but thats another issue.
appreciate your opinion.........larry
 

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Ph.D > me
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Discussion Starter #3
stilwrks said:
well Phil, might as well put in my 2c worth, in the form of a question.

more on road race track then street.
using 5zigin 17x8 with a 35 offset. also longer studs up front with concentric hub spacers to clear the brembo system. tires are 225/45.
my question is would 235's clear? the more rubber the better, if possible?
i may also go into race rubber but thats another issue.
appreciate your opinion.........larry
Ty had 17x8 +35 5zigen FN01R-C's with 235/45-17 Toyo T1-S's on his 3g with Stoptech brakes and he didn't need any spacers. My guess is that the difference between where Stoptech's and Brembo's calipers sit is menial at best so I doubt that you'd need spacers.



 

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Wheel Clearance



Wheel Parts



Wheel Size



Tire Size

1-Tire width (mm or inch)
2-Aspect ratio
3-Radial construction
4-Rim diameter
5-Load index
6-Speed symbol
7-Tire outer diameter (inch)
8-Ply rating
 

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Dumb rubbing question

OK. Currently my spyder is stock but I am planning to lower it with eibach pro-kit springs (might go coil overs if I can afford it).

I am looking at 18x8's running a 42 offset and a 225/40x18 tires.

I don't think it will rub but I don't wanna spend $1505 for the wheels and tires + shipping if they are going to rub.

Thx in advance.
 

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is the gts rim offset the same as the gt?
 

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Tire Size "will they fit" new rims

I have a 2000 GT with factory 17" rims and I think they are total shit I bent one after only a week on an unknown road defect and I plan on getting a set of Motegi MR7 17x7 5-114.3 40 and I want to know if my stock tires will fit these rims 215/50/zr17 front 205/45/17 rear (stock) or if I will need new tires, tires have atleast 75% tread left these are the rims I plan on getting http://www.andysautosport.com/mitsubishi/2000_9999_eclipse/wheels/wheels_and_tires/motegi/mote00094741.html
 

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My Bad Correction

I feel stupid now I just looked at my tires a second time corrected sizes are front 215/50/zr17 rear 225/45/17 so by the size chart you provided they should fit the motegi's that I plan on getting unless I'm reading something wrong I know the corrected sizes are correct though.
 

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Ph.D > me
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Discussion Starter #19
Yeah, they'll fit the 7" wide Motegi's. But I'd definitely suggest that you get the same tire size all around.
 

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Thanks

I want the same size all around I got the car like that and the tread was like new so I figured I'd wear them out a bit more. thank you very much for the information I appreciate it very much now I can go ahead and order my motegi's and my intake.
 
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